Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast

Episode 5-Politics is a Combat Sport Part 1 Featuring the Prince of Palm Beach County Dr. Andre Fladell

August 05, 2020 Prince of Palm Beach County Dr. Andre Fladell Season 1 Episode 5
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 5-Politics is a Combat Sport Part 1 Featuring the Prince of Palm Beach County Dr. Andre Fladell
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Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 5-Politics is a Combat Sport Part 1 Featuring the Prince of Palm Beach County Dr. Andre Fladell
Aug 05, 2020 Season 1 Episode 5
Prince of Palm Beach County Dr. Andre Fladell

Join Host Steven Wallace, Esq. and Co-Host Celena Muzic as they interview the Prince of Palm Beach County Dr. Andre Fladell as they discuss such pertinent political topics including:

How Dr. Fladell got started in Politics
Dr. Fladell's Consensus Building and Political Philosophy
Political History of Community Activism and Civic Organizations in Palm Beach County, Florida
Historical Structure of Palm Beach County Commission and Establishment of Single Commission Districts
History of Palm Beach County Growth Management
Discussion of 2000 Election Recount and How Dr. Fladell Because Lead Plaintiff in the "Palm Beach County Butterfly Ballot" Florida Supreme Court Case
Discussion About Palm Beach County Mask Mandate
Is Politics a Combat Sport?
Lightning Round

Show Notes Transcript

Join Host Steven Wallace, Esq. and Co-Host Celena Muzic as they interview the Prince of Palm Beach County Dr. Andre Fladell as they discuss such pertinent political topics including:

How Dr. Fladell got started in Politics
Dr. Fladell's Consensus Building and Political Philosophy
Political History of Community Activism and Civic Organizations in Palm Beach County, Florida
Historical Structure of Palm Beach County Commission and Establishment of Single Commission Districts
History of Palm Beach County Growth Management
Discussion of 2000 Election Recount and How Dr. Fladell Because Lead Plaintiff in the "Palm Beach County Butterfly Ballot" Florida Supreme Court Case
Discussion About Palm Beach County Mask Mandate
Is Politics a Combat Sport?
Lightning Round

Andre Fladell:

okay, so,

Steven E. Wallace:

so let's get

Andre Fladell:

started.

Steven E. Wallace:

Where did you grow up?

Andre Fladell:

I grew up in Brooklyn, New York. And at a point in time, my parents moved to Nashville County, long Island. Okay, great. And so you

Steven E. Wallace:

you've been involved in politics for many, many years, more years than Celina has been alive on this earth. And when did you first get involved in politics?

Andre Fladell:

When I was in college, they had a Vietnam war. And in the course of that period, they were drafting people into the army to fight. And the draft was going on and on for many, many years. And they changed the nature of the draft at one point to those people that were majoring in essential occupations. So if you major in drama art, you got drafted, but if you're going to be a doctor, you didn't. So people change their majors to accommodate not being drafted. Then they changed it again. So if you were in the top half of their class, you wouldn't be drafted, but the bottom half would be drafted. So we changed majors again. So we take the easier courses and it became so convoluted that the kids in college in those days were drawn into a political movement to try to end the war, not be drafted and to at the end of the day,

Steven E. Wallace:

Excellent. So after college you decided to become a chiropractor. Can you tell us, you know, why you decided to become a chiropractor?

Andre Fladell:

Yes. my father said I either had to get a job or go to school and getting a job seemed to be the worst option. my family said that you become a doctor or a lawyer because that's what your choices were. And it sounds like

Steven E. Wallace:

my family too.

Andre Fladell:

Right.

Steven E. Wallace:

I took the ladder lawyer.

Andre Fladell:

Exactly and, well, and if you have no personality, you could become an accountant apparently. But, my parents said you go to school, get a job. And it seemed like going to school be easier. And there was a chiropractic school in Glen Cove, in Nashville County. So I, I went to that school and became a chiropractor with no real thought of ever doing that. Okay.

Steven E. Wallace:

And then after chiropractic school,

Andre Fladell:

Did you move to Florida? Yes, I did move to Florida. I wanted to go to another school for another three years, but apparently that wasn't an option I was afforded and I actually found out they want them to go out and actually do something real. So I went to fodder and set up in Delray chiropractic center in the 1970s and became a chiropractor for about 35 years.

Steven E. Wallace:

Okay. So moved to South Florida in 2002, Selena moved here three or four years ago. So can you tell us about South Florida in the seventies? I'm thinking surf boards,

Andre Fladell:

ocean,

Steven E. Wallace:

a lot of open space, bell bottoms.

Andre Fladell:

you want to think of it a little bit differently? Homage County particularly was essentially an agricultural County with not a lot of northerners and Northern or considered Yankees. And the Yankee Confederate mindset you said existed in a city like Delray, for example. Right. I moved to it in the 1978, 1977. the chief of police openly didn't particularly care for blacks or Jews. It was very clear. the Jews weren't welcome in restaurants, the blacks weren't really, welcomed to be East of Swinton in the downtown area at nighttime. They were squirted out. in the 1980s, they were protests by the African Americans on the beach, blocking the wage to the beach. I mean, there, the, it was the South. I wasn't aware of any Jew, a black that had ever been elected in Palm beach County countywide. And I don't believe there were any, it was a very different kind of place. It was West of the 95 area. They were developing all these new projects. These hos, these. Kings points, these large century villages. And then

Steven E. Wallace:

for our listeners, when we're talking about hos and Kings points and century village, we're talking about condominium complexes and homeowner associations.

Andre Fladell:

Yes. And they were coming in by the thousands and they were advertising for people to be moving from the Northeast, particularly at that time. So from New York New Jersey and. Baltimore and Massachusetts people were coming in thousands. we in the population, farmers, southerners and good old boys. And all of a sudden in these areas, 8,000 people from the North would move in and one development and 4,000 and another, and the population shifted dramatically. So. That was the way the place was starting to change original. Who were the farmers resented? What was happening? There was great conflict and resentment between us Northern people when we came down here because. They didn't want the farmers to burn things next to their homes and their fields. They didn't want the farmers carrying guns. They didn't want the dogs to be free on leashes. They didn't want them pulling on the side of the road and drinking beer. So this population that moved here started regulating the people who lived here and it even further offended them that the new people were governing and taking the rules and regulations of their social existence. And we would change and get in a very rapid pace. it made for really a very big resentment between we who moved here versus the people who originally occupied this land.

Steven E. Wallace:

So Prince I've known you at least 10 years. And one of the things that I admire greatly about you, not only your quick witted mine You're funny jokes, but you're a coalition builder. And so can you take us back to that timeframe when there was a lot of strife between the folks that have been here for a very long time, and then the new quote unquote Yankees. I know you were at the forefront on building coalition amongst the different parties. And could you go and elaborate a little bit on that? Yes.

Andre Fladell:

We had formed a bunch of organizations. These would be four, there were Cobra. And before Westbrook community council before Del Ray Alliance, before these lodge big umbrella existed, there were these little organizations representing maybe just King's point, maybe. a democratic club, there was only one called the Atlantic democratic club. what we did was we organized all these developments. We organize the leader of the presidents of these HOA. So they function as a unit so we can have a singularity in voice. So we could at least negotiate with some authority. We met with a man named Billy Bowman. Bowman is the key farmer who created the. Alliance, we call condos and Cowboys. And that's what it was called. If you look at a magazine cover, you'll see, there's a picture of the farmers in us, standing in front of cows in front of a barn. When the Alliance was formed, the Palm beach County farm Bureau, what later became the range line coalition, which has all the old time farmers started meeting with. We have the condominiums of the HOA And we started developing a relationship that was extraordinary. We looked after their interests and we were more sensitive to what wanted and they provided extraordinary amounts of funding and money for the candidates that we chose to run for office. So they became our funding for candidates that we were about to run for County commission, state house, Senate, and the money was extraordinary and we provided protection for the interest that they had as farmers. A lot of us had never been on a farm, including me. And so you're out there learning about how cows produce milk and how crops grow and about the temperature and the nature of water and the effect on crops. And they were learning about what we were as urban city dwellers, what we thought. so, you know, as, someone who had a Seder in my home for Passover I'd have the farmers in my house having a Seder, which was news. Billy Bowman was bar mitzvah'd ultimately his presence. He didn't know what a bond missionary was. He actually thought it was a breast. Well,

Steven E. Wallace:

luckily he was, he was happy. It wasn't a breast. Let's

Andre Fladell:

just say that he was concerned. and the relationship between the farmers and the condoms and Cowboys flourished. So it became an even stronger Alliance because we had then the umbrella organizations, which developed a friend rash started 1978 with the Westbrook broker community council. When I was there with her on that. And Frank Bierman started with the gallery Alliance and the 1990 Richard Carrington can send in and now Mueller and myself started Cobra back in the 1980s. So now we had all these umbrella groups growing, which had large populations and we had the farmers and agricultural people with us. We formed the boaters coalition, the women's coalition, the Kings point democratic club, the century democratic club, Chuck window formed the Boca Delray democratic club. Ken Rosenblatt from the West Boca. Right? I was,

Steven E. Wallace:

I was president of that club for three years.

Andre Fladell:

Jack Babbage started the it right democratic club. Tom young started the Atlantic democratic club and I can give you a list and these are back old, 1978 to 1980. Cool.

Steven E. Wallace:

You're mentioning all these democratic clubs, but you've gone on record many times to say that you're neither one party or the other. Could you elaborate a little bit on that?

Andre Fladell:

I'm a John F. Kennedy kind of person, and I got into politics on the him while my father's a good Republican and pro business on pro-business all the way, all the time. I'm pro choice, church and state separation, and socially I'm always been theoretically, a Democrat. Even today, I've never less left the democratic party. I once joined the party may be leaving me, but I certainly haven't left that party. Currently. I think both parties have become unreasonable left and right. I think that the primaries push candidates from the middle. And I think the primaries are inconsistent with the healthy America. And I think they get in the way of good government. So yes, I am a Democrat and yes, philosophically on economic issues, you can label me as Republican theoretically. And I

Steven E. Wallace:

think you and I share a lot of the similar views on, on both of those issues. Selena, you have a question for

Celena Muzic:

Prince you're like, do I have a question regarding politics and how someone goes into that? Without any prior knowledge of politics, what advice would you give someone looking right now to get into politics in Palm beach County?

Andre Fladell:

You find a campaign of a candidate. That's interesting whether you know them or not, doesn't matter and you hook onto it. And in volunteering you learn the ground. In other words, you're going to go into a war jungle, but you know nothing about it. So you find the Sergeant of the platoon. He teaches you how to avoid booby traps, how to not step on landmines, how to know where the tunnels are. If you're going to anything you hook on, whether it's an attorney, you go to a law firm and you clerk. In politics, it's simple. There are campaigns and issues. You pick one, you sit quietly and tight to the people who are clever and you learn procedure in politics. The key is not to make error. Victories are made by the it's like playing chess. Just didn't want to lose pieces for no reason, or you can't win the game. You can be a very good chess player, but you have to protect your pieces. Similarly, in politics, the object is not to say things which set you so far back, that you can't recover. Not to move your energy, your troops, your forces in places, in such a way that they get decimated. So just strategy concept of how to achieve goals.

Steven E. Wallace:

Excellent answer prints. Okay. My next question. And we're just kind of going through our timeline here. So you created those various coalitions and my understanding is that at one point the County commission in Palm beach County was County wide.

Andre Fladell:

And

Steven E. Wallace:

then ultimately, As a result of a lot of the hard work that you did, there was a decision where each County commissioner would represent a certain district. Could you elaborate a little bit on that?

Andre Fladell:

Yeah. Yes. All the elections were countywide and every single election was determined by a council of presidents or a political action committee. We had put together because we overwhelmingly had the largest blocks and we would sit and determine winners and losers. 1986 or so, John R. Smith, Lloyd Ecclestone, John temple, and a bunch of the business characters, or just pro business change the charter of the County. So that County wide elections would not occur anymore. And they can elect people by districts to isolate condominiums and homeowners into one or two districts. They believe they would take back control of the County, which it didn't quite work out that way, but we made great friends with them, closest relationships. My closest friends are giant temples and the Lloyd Ecclestone's and the journal of Smith's. these are turned to be the greatest teachers and political allies in the County. And we now work with them as allies. but they tried to undo the whole that they believed the homeless had on government and wanted to recover it.

Steven E. Wallace:

there was a point in time where your coalition actually had a moratorium on development for a time. Sir. Could you elaborate a little bit on that?

Andre Fladell:

At the time there were no impact fees that were worth anything. So when you would build homes, the people who lived here had to pay for the roads, the schools, the wastewater treatment plants. So the first thing we wanted to do was create impact these. So the people moved here. I would do that. Secondly, there will no traffic performance standards. That means that you can build places where the traffic was unbearable and no burden on building a widening roads. Third, we had no school impact fees and they just, it goes on and on. So that the density, the amount of the units you could put acre would horrible for the use of land. So we wanted to change the entire function of the land use the way it was being developed. The density. So we created a moratorium and stopped all permits for a period of time and spent that time rewriting how development would go forward and you'll, if you look at the articles and anyone can look that up on the archives and there are lots of them, it will say we did it six months, and more tournament by the way means death. That's what the word comes from, but they didn't really create a death. Because Palm beach County was the largest growing area in the United States. We were growing at a rate. Everybody was moving to Florida, particularly Southeast Florida. We had a backlog So when people would apply to build that was six months just backlog. So they didn't really lose any time, as much as the process stopped for a short period. And in that period, we wrote and the reason Palm beach County doesn't look like Broward. Is because at that time we changed how many units per acre, how an ag reserve would work, what we would accept in height. I mean, we really improved how Palm beach County came to be. And we stopped it from really being just a runaway pavement of South Florida. We believe in Palm beach County, we drew a line and held it very well.

Steven E. Wallace:

Excellent. you've became famous during the 2000 election. And that's actually where, where I first met you. I was moving to Texas and I remember I was glued to the television during the recount with the hanging CHADS and the butterfly ballots. And you actually have a distinction because you were a named plaintiff. In the butterfly ballot case. Could you just give us a little bit of background and just some things that we don't even know, that's behind the scenes inside baseball on what happened

Celena Muzic:

secret school. Right. And I

Steven E. Wallace:

actually always love to quote your case calls for a certain legal precedent procedurally. And I always love that case because I'm quoting my friend Prince's case.

Andre Fladell:

so people refer to it as the butterfly ballot The case was Andre, Dell versus Palm beach County canvassing. The case that winds up in the Supreme court was actually my case when I filed it at eight o'clock in the morning, the day after the election. I am the lead play if that stopped the presidential election at that time. But let me tell you why. So you understand, because it was not about Democrats or Republicans had nothing to do with it. In the state of Florida in the statute in capital letters, it says that the party of the governor must be the first punch hole and must be the first candidate. So whenever human being in this County, where the state goes to vote, Always today, the Republican has to be the first name must be the first name and the party getting the second amount of boats for governor, which is the democratic party had to be the second punch hole one marking. So when you go to vote the state house, when you go to the Senate, whatever you do, you may not realize it. But the Republican name is always first and the Democrat is always second. That's number one, that's statutory. Number two, the name must be on the left and the marking point, whether it be punched must be on the right every time you vote in our statutes, not once it explains it five different ways. The name must be on the left and the Mark must be on the right. Those are statute requirements The people who are the oldest and the people who don't see that well the one thing they know, they all vote all the time and they know the statute. If you hit the first hole, it's gotta be a Republican. And the second had to be a Democrat on that one page on that one ballot, in that one election. That statute was violated on both of those positions. The second hole was not the Democrat. The second hole was not on the right. The second hole was on the left, coming from another page. So you say, well, why didn't they be more careful because I can vote when I'm blind I don't have to even read it. The names came from both sides. It wouldn't have even occurred to me. in century village. There were 286 people. Who voted 16 times the Democrats on that ballot and on the prison in the United States voted the pack. You can, instead of Joe Lieberman, the vice-president. So our unique process occurred in Palm beach County, only in this County, only on that page, only that election, because the statute was violated and the ballot was set in a way they had never done before people hit the second punch hole. In every single thing they voted for that day. And on this one, topical president, it was led them to the warm point, neutral, thirdly, the directions and the instructions on how to perform the ballot were never changed. So when you got the instruction to the ballot, walking in the poll, it said hit the punch hole to the right of the name. There was no punch hole to the right of Pat Buchanan. The punch hole was to the left, but they never changed the instruction. I filed the lawsuit saying that the ballot was noncompliant with Florida statute. That's

Steven E. Wallace:

it. And as a result, what could you just walk through our listeners that aren't familiar with the end result of the case? Can you let us

Andre Fladell:

know what happened? There was insufficient noncompliance for the remedy sort. What that means is, and I spoke to the justices afterwards. I know that

Steven E. Wallace:

is this the Florida Supreme court of the U S Supreme court. This

Andre Fladell:

is started in Florida Supreme court. What they said was they agreed that there wasn't compliance with statute, the remedy of a revolt was none. different people might've been available, the weather might be different. Different candidates would have different money that the circumstance of that election on the constitution does not provide for them remedy. They said that there was insufficient noncompliance accepting that the statute was violated for the remedy sought, which means what we asked for just simply was not achievable when the United States in court stops the recount at some point and declares a president. It's of course in the end, the Supreme courts on both levels decided that the remedy just simply didn't exist. Okay, great.

Steven E. Wallace:

So Selena and I are going to ask you one more question each and then we're going to go to our lightning round, which is this or that without any, without any thinking. And that'll, that'll conclude part one, but I want our listeners to, to be aware that we are going to have a part two of politics as a combat sport do you listeners Selena, do you want to ask

Andre Fladell:

your last question? Yeah, I would want to know what do you think about this mask situation going on and if it should be federally mandated. Okay. First you have to look at the nature of virus in Corona and Cobin. We know that it's called Corona because of the shape of the virus. We know it's called COVID-19 ghost. It was discovered in 2019, we know that murders and Saraj with viruses of a similar form. We know the virus is caused by something called zoonosis zoonosis is a virus from another species. We know that once the virus goes from one species to another, the second species has a different, less sensitive ability to re to resist the virus. In other words, within the species, our species, we get mumps and measles and chicken and. We can get immunities and we deal with them, but we've never dealt with this particular virus. It didn't come from the human species. Initially, we know that viruses are the only organism that can reproduce without a host cell. We know that viruses like in computers create something called transcription. They get into the human cell and they mutate the DNA. We know that when you take the DNA, the cell becomes the new. it becomes a new uterus. It becomes a new birthplace of the two new virus cells. And then they go to the next cells. We know that the human cell produces a protein RNA, and that protein becomes the blocker of the virus transcription. We know that interferon is the substance, which in the human body quizzes, the bite, the protein to be formed. So we know a lot about viruses. We know how they work. We know about this virus. The fact is the virus has been handled wrong from the beginning in the last bar is similar. When you go to the Hong Kong flu or the Asian flu, where the bird flu or the swine flu and give you a lot of them. The average life expectancy in 1990 and 1980s was 68.9 69. The life expectancy of a human being today is 78. The death rate in the age limit from 68 to 78 is at 18%. Let's say. That age group didn't exist theoretically, or the human average death was at 68. So everybody alive it's 78 are the ones that are done more rapidly or more frequently. Now, why would that be? Which would keeping people alive through medication, through transplants, through, we have people in secondary conditions that normally would never have existed. 30 years ago. So the first thing to remember about the viruses in other years, before computers, before CNN, before social media, this would have been considered flu season. It's not flu you seasoned because we see it coming because we have communication and technology that allows us to project something which in 1980 would never been projected. It simply would have been a deadly flow. In this situation, the government started reacting to social media and television and news media, which loves to glorify all this. And matter of fact, If you turn on CNN, do you think it was a telephone? And they've got numbers of how many people died last week and they grabbed it. And they're so excited when the number gets beat this week, 10,000 people died in Florida or whatever, whatever. That's

Steven E. Wallace:

why I don't watch the news.

Andre Fladell:

Right? So what you have is a massive distortion of what's really going on. They project. This could be 80,000 desks and there was 140,000 deaths, 20,000 deaths. First of all you have, they're projecting things. They have no idea what they're projecting. They're projecting them because they're forced into having to come up with answers. They should never even try to guess to. So the projections were, have been inconsistent and inaccurate on every level from every agency. The States each state has approached this differently. Some close down some didn't close down. The North would blame the South New York. in California. What we do know is viruses are not going to be stopped. It's only a question of when the virus gets through the population which it's going to do with, or without anybody. The president of the United States is an illusion lose situation. Not because it's a Republican or a Democrat, because whoever was in charge, he was going to take the hit. When you have a war and you win a war, you become a great president, Washington Lincoln Jackson, Wilson, pick a war. Franklin Delano Roosevelt. You win the warrior. A great president. If you lose the way, you're a lousy president. And so in the spires, you can't win this, you lose this war because there's a death rate. So to answer your question about masks, I think this entire thing was handled them properly. I think we should have allowed people under the age of 30, who had no secondary conditions. To voluntarily get the virus early with a very minimum risk. We could have controlled the antivirus. Sarah, you controlled the immunity, not by the make-believe herd immunity concept. My byline firefighters and police and teachers and nurses who were under the age of 30 to get this virus without much risk of anything or the minimum symptom, they wouldn't affect their mothers. They wouldn't affect their fathers. They wouldn't affect their families. They'd never be able to transmit it cause they don't have the immunity. We wouldn't have a problem with protective gear. Of course we would have allowed the younger part of our population to take themselves out of the infectious stage equation. They would have been self employed. We could have controlled their infections, let them get over it. And then we would have had 25 to 30% of our service population, not needing, Mascon not infecting their parents and grandparents had we done this and have we considered this for next time, then we'd realized that you don't fight a virus by closing your eyes and sticking your head in the hole. You fight a virus by controlling who it affects and protecting those who are most in jeopardy and the answer to your masks. They were in government. You always have the public good versus the private right. In everything you do as an attorney and everything you do in land use and everything you do in constitutional balances of a rights is the public good. And the private right. My private right. Is to go home and do whatever I want. Anytime I want, I can wash my face and bacteria. If it makes me feel good. But when I'm going to affect another human being outside of my own, you argument that the public good becomes part of the argument. So when you ask that question in balancing the private right versus the public good, I believe I should have the right, not to wear a mask, but I do public good dictates that I have the social responsibility. So I think the government in an emergency has the legitimate constitutional right to demand people wear masks. Although I find it offensive. I respect that. Right. I respect the public. Good is what the government must do in this case when it has no place book. Although I, I have a resentment for it, I respect it. I follow it. I obey it. There's a lot of things I don't agree with. I think I should be able to smoke pot and I've been doing so since I'm a kid, the government said I should go to jail. Well for that now the government thinks I don't need to go to jail for that. People want to do shelter drinking alcohol now. It's okay. The government through time changes his view on things, but the government has an inherent right to protect the public. That's what the constitution was about. Promote the general welfare, the preamble, and provide for the common defense. So why they support the legislation or the attempt in an emergency. I resented individually.

Steven E. Wallace:

Excellent. Excellent answer. So then my last question, before we go to the lightning round, is, is politics a combat sport? And why

Andre Fladell:

war is politics with bloodshed that's who a war ever is, whether you're gaining land and gaining something or a theory of who should govern, how ticks is war without bloodshed, but it's no less of a war. If I have. And I was in college. We had a Vietnam war and we were being drafted. Someone was taking my mother and father's child and saying, you have to go kill somebody around the world. These people are having a domino effect. They're going to be communists. So you have to kill them in stat. So someone saying to me that I have to die because someone made a political decision. That I have to be sacrificed to protect the nation, provide for the common defense. And I have to do this by going around the world and some jungle and killing people. Well, they kill me. So if I am now working a campaign in Palm beach County and a person running has children and has a family. And in the course of this campaign, that family gets harmed well, if that person gets elected, he's going to say whether my son is going to go to jail for smoking pot or not. He's going to say with their comp has the right to beat up someone. They arrest him that he says, but the stand your ground is a lower or not. If I think that person running for office is going to harm my children. He's going to harm my family and harming his is perfectly just the Bible to stop him before he gets to the place where he will inevitably harm my family. So politics has to be a combat sport, cause we're not in a high school student council anymore. And the result of the legislation, these people will pass will absolutely annihilate my family. If they, what they pass, it's horrendous. My kids don't need to pray in school necessarily. And I just believe that. The cost of tuition, censorship of texts, all these things they can and do do are dangerous. Then I will stop the human being. Who's dangerous from getting there, including damaging their life. So, yes, I don't know how much more combative it gets. Game of Thrones is, you know, Wilson, Wilson infections become real, but at the end of the day, you're deciding who are you on the menu? Would you sit at the table? The people who say I don't want to be involved with politics. It's fine by me. I'll make, I'll tell you which way you drive down the street. How big a houses can be, what your occupation is. Since you're going to look like I'm going to make the rules, you're going to live by our rules. If you want to be engaged, then we'll live by some of your rules. How old the child is before they can drive how old the child is before they can vote. How will the child is before they can drink? Protecting of children themselves. Do you want to let us make the rules and just do whatever we tell you where you want to get involved and you want to make a difference. You want to be on the menu. I'm glad to have you on the menu. No, I want some dragons. I want to be on that table. I sit at the table, then you sit at the table. So it's combat because we're in a Republic where a theoretical democracy. It sets up to be combative, unlike a kingdom where the King rules, there's no combat in the society because the God gives power to the cane in our country. God gives power to the people, read the declaration of independence.

Steven E. Wallace:

Excellent. Selena, do you want to handle the lightening round for the part

Andre Fladell:

one? I will. I will. All right. I got some, some quick questions. You're going to answer it with no thought. Okay. All right. Cats or dogs? Cats, or dogs? Dogs, Apple or Microsoft? Neither. Okay. Game of Thrones or house of cards, sneakers or sandals? BC handles my loggers sneakers. I was her oranges. Oranges basketball or football. Oh man. I got a basketball court in my house and I love it. Okay. I'm going to throw this curve ball at you. New York. Okay. Florida, Florida. Okay. Cool. That's it.

Steven E. Wallace:

Thank you so much and stay tuned and thank you again. Prince of Palm beach County, dr. Andre Philadel, and please listeners. This is only part one of politics as a combat sport. And we look forward to speaking with the Prince of Palm beach County, dr. Andre Philadelphia part two shortly. Thanks so much.

Andre Fladell:

Bye