Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast

Episode 7-Working with Family Offices-Brian Delucia

August 12, 2020 Brian DeLucia Season 1 Episode 7
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 7-Working with Family Offices-Brian Delucia
Show Notes Transcript

Join Host Steve Wallace and Co-Host Celena Muzic of The Wallace Law Group, PL as they interview Brian DeLucia of Arrivato, LLC.

Topics Covered Include:
What is a Family Office?
Mr. DeLucia's Experience working in the NFL
How to Work with Family Offices?
How to Get Involved in the Real Estate Industry?
Current State of the Real Estate Market
Pop Culture Banter
Lightning Round

Steve Wallace:

we have the privilege of having Brian dilution. thank you so much for Ryan for taking time out of your schedule. So in, in this episode, We're going to talk about what our family offices, and how you can work with them to fund your real estate and business transactions.

Brian Delucia:

thank you for having me on and family offices it's come in all different shapes and sizes and forms, I guess you would say these days, but, ultimately. it's usually the private office for business affairs and governance, whether it's for a particular family or a collection of families, if you have a philanthropic plan and ultimately how you're coming to making decisions as a family. you know, how you're handling. Then your security needs and then ultimately how you're preparing, next generation in terms of their career and professional ambitions, whether they're going to transition, stay within the family business or, the family led industries that they're involved in. Were they have different industry passions or ideas and just how you prepare them for either, direction. And on the investment side you're just again there are so many different ways that, you know, different families go about it. There's some families that are just lately, has to live and they just look to, Hire good managers to handle trading for them or invest into venture and PE funds or real estate funds. And then there's others that still have active businesses yet. that they're operating their businesses, but they're also looking at other investment opportunities and then certainly. Yeah, the other is families looking for really good opportunities to strategically align with, emerging up and coming entrepreneurs or business owners or real estate developers, you just helping 'em, scale to, another level.

Steve Wallace:

That sounds great, Brian, so let's take a couple steps back for our listeners. so I guess my first question is, how does somebody find all these folks to work with? And if just along those lines, if you could just let our listeners know your background,

Brian Delucia:

my background is, I come from a land and real estate development background, part of my family. some of our family friends going back in our Pennsylvania days, almost going back to the 1970s have been very active in large scale, residential lot residential, you know, built building development and, No, ultimately over the year, that's scaled up into a pretty high level, high volume business. And then along the way, have been in and out of some other traditional businesses outside of real estate, whether it's been together or separately, amongst us and, you know, these days, you know, we're a bunch of next gens with, different silos.

Steve Wallace:

Interesting. Very interesting. So you mentioned Pennsylvania. What part of Pennsylvania did you grow up in?

Brian Delucia:

So I grew up in the, Allentown, Pennsylvania area. Most of my family is scattered throughout, Southeastern Pennsylvania between. No, Allentown in Philadelphia.

Steve Wallace:

Okay, great. And do you currently live in Pennsylvania? I know when we we've met a couple of times before, so just, just to, you know, really kind of tout social media, Brian and I we're we're connections on LinkedIn and we established a very nice relationship over the years. And so whenever Brian's in South Florida, he always comes to visit and we usually have a. At least a half hour, 45 minute chat. So I haven't talked to him in a while and I, you know, he's got a lot of benefit to our listeners. So I, you know, graciously accepted our invitation of beyond today's episode.

Brian Delucia:

yeah, no, it's, it's definitely been a. I think early in the winter. So last time I was in UK over in your office So we do have a family home in the Delray beach, Florida, and which is only about 15 minutes from your office. so, so I try to, you know, get the CEO a few times a year and, also, still have a residence in Pennsylvania as well as, New York city.

Steve Wallace:

so, are you sitting in New York city now or are you okay, so can you give us our listeners a little update on kind of what the climate is right now and with concerning the pandemic in New York city?

Brian Delucia:

Sure. Well, you know, certainly give a governor. Cuomo a lot of credit for, you know, and as well as, I mean, it's fucking,

Steve Wallace:

my law school is a Syracuse university law grad, so it goes back to the governor go orange.

Brian Delucia:

so, but yeah, I mean, ultimately, I mean, it takes a village and you got to give a lot of the new Yorkers here, credit, even though it's a difficult sacrifice and nobody likes to be cooped up but, Yeah, a lot of people for a few months cooperated, they for the most part stayed, locked down social distance and then once people started really coming out a little bit more, I would say, you know, probably about 80% of the people, you know, have been out and about wearing masks. Yeah. And, you know, it ended up, you know, doing a really good job of flattening that curve. So to say, and. And, you know, in, in, in recent weeks, you know, New York, has, you know, one of the things, I guess, the lowest transmission rates, you know, in the, in the nation right now, you know, certainly it's too early to say, you know, we certainly did not defeat the, You know, the, the virus by any means. I mean, it's still present yet. And you know, I, I definitely do have some concerns, you know? I mean, you still hear about, you know, some large gatherings of people get together in central park and yeah. Not, not wearing masks, cross the. You know, the river in Jersey city, you see the same things and then people going out to the Hamptons and the beaches, and then the other coming back into the mainstream part of the city again. And then you certainly have, you know, people traveling, you know, from other parts of the country, you know, in the New York. And yeah, so there there's definitely concerns that, you know, we could have a. Yeah, spikes again and numbers, but, you know, you know, but nonetheless, I mean, you know, the efforts that we took before they worked and if we could just stay village and with we can make those work again.

Steve Wallace:

So we mean as a fellow New York, she grew up in New York city. So I'm sure she's got some questions for you.

Celena Muzic:

well, I wanted to know actually one of, one of the questions is. How has this pandemic effected the market in your line of work?

Brian Delucia:

Well, I mean, yes, fortunately, due to our most active business that we're involved in, you know, we have a very high margin business that, Yeah, where we control the, you know, the budget and, you know, and as a result, you know, we have a lot of room to work with compared to, I think a lot of real estate, you know, investors and owner operators or asset owners that, you know, probably we were buying the top of a market existing product over the last few years. And. Yeah, where there's very little margin for error. And then also, you know, I think we've been fortunate on a timing perspective, you know, with real estate development projects that we did not have any that were late term construction going into a, you know, a leasing phase, but, Yeah. One of the good things is, you know, because we're in some of the Southeastern Texas suburban, you know, infill locations, you know, you, you have a lot of people that right now, or, you know, you've been through the pandemic relocating down there and also, you know, that's going to be a trend that, you know, that's certainly going to. You know, continue, but the other, you know, the other, the advantage, I think for us as a type of a multifamily product, we built, it's not a normal Rackem stack. you know, you have, it's, it's a little spread out. It feels like home community, you know, everybody has a separate door and garage and, you know, I think that's something that certainly is very attractive and. In a, you know, COVID and post COVID environment. And, you know, certainly, you know, our different, PRI you know, communities, you know, have walking trails, dog parks, and, you know, that certainly allows people to be out there, you know, very responsibly as well, and avoid, you know, a, you know, a lot of, I guess you would say close contact with others.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. Great. So tell us a little more in detail, you, you were, you were kind of alluding to some of the projects you're working on. I know you're involved in a variety of different sectors. I guess we can start with real estate cause that's near and dear to our heart, Florida. And there's a big bulk of our practice area in Florida. What current projects are you working on? Just, you don't have to tell me that, but just kind of the. Gradual locations and the number of units that you're working on.

Brian Delucia:

Sure. Well, right now, we have 14 different projects in our pipeline. you know, and those, course, you know, the, in Georgia, the Atlanta market, Savannah setting out the, you know, the Carolinas, especially like the Charleston market. Florida, mostly like central Florida and the Gulf side of the state, as well as Tennessee. You know, we have a few, projects coming up and then, you know, we, we've made also a very aggressive over the last year and a half move into the Texas market. And we have several sites in the Dallas Fort worth market and also. you know, very active, or I should say a little bit more increasing activity in the, you know, the Austin market as well. Okay, great. Cause I used to practice in Dallas right outside of law school. So I'm just curious, cause we have a lot of listeners in the Dallas Fort worth market in Houston. So what, where exactly are some of your projects in the metroplex area? Yeah, they're a, you know, like you got the Plano Frisco and McKinney, you know, on the Dallas side and then on the Fort worth side a little more that I

Steve Wallace:

Okay, great. So I'm not sure if you're aware, but I'm a big Dallas Cowboys fan. So Trent transitioning the discussion. One, one, one, one fun fact about. Brian is when he was younger before the advent of, of, you know, a lot of these scouting, surfaces, skirts, and services, online, he actually started, a high school recruiting service. So could you tell us a little bit more about that and how you kind of fell into that?

Brian Delucia:

Well, I did some stuff in the high school area, but you know, ultimately what I was doing is more of the college NFL. I had a passion for, you know, for sports growing up. No baseball, football, basketball. And I always had a fascination with the coaching side and the strategy side, you know, nonetheless, I mean, I love playing and competing and I had a lot of fun with that, but I also just had that passion for, you know, how a teams build themselves, how they develop players and, especially in like baseball and football. And then ultimately, you know, it's funny story when I was in high school. I think that was the, that was a year of the, baseball strike and there was no baseball I had, you know, I had basic essentially I suppose, would have won the world series that yeah. And I had no classes in the afternoon. And so I had a lot of free time on my hands and I started putting a lot of my thoughts on paper, about the NFL, the, you know, in the upcoming draft and everything. And, and that resulted in me writing it up like booklet, that, when I was in college, people found that kind of fascinating. And, ultimately I met a scout from the Philadelphia Eagles, and then, and they, they were reading some of my stuff and really enjoyed it quite a bit. Next thing, you know, he's introducing me to some Scouts for other teams, and I got to know some of the general managers back then and a couple of the owners and, Ultimately, I had a gentleman who introduced me to somebody over at Fox sports back in the day. And at age 21, I was writing a player personnel content, both on the pro personnel and the college scouting side, for, you know, covering the NFL draft throughout the year, covering the NFL season and doing it from a angle on how a. General manager, you know what look at, you know, building, you know, building a, you know, and making decisions regarding, you know, you know, their teams growth, ultimately, you know, whether, you know, they're doing, you know, they're selecting players who to draft or how they're approaching, you know, free agency, you know, and, you know, the type of offensive and defensive players. That they like to build around within their systems and the personalities of the various coaches and how they mix with the players. And it was, it was a lot of fun back then. Okay.

Steve Wallace:

So through your experiences, I'm going to ask you a couple of questions related to that. So who was the nicest coach you ever dealt with during that timeframe?

Brian Delucia:

And John Hart and John horrible. Okay. Andy reads a little hometown favorite though, right? he was always a very nice, gentlemen, same thing, John horrible was just a great guy. Whenever you met him and spoke with him

Steve Wallace:

and who was the most unpleasant coach that you ever dealt with?

Brian Delucia:

honestly, there was there, there was no, no coaches that I would say were rude. you know, I mean, you know, there was a couple that I, you know, I certainly don't want to name cause one of them is still active in the league yet. but who was a little bit of a different personality. but, but for the most part, I mean, most of the coaches. Yeah. As long as you, you know, you treat it, you know, right. You know, I said that you got along with them. I spoke, I ended up speaking the same languages, a lot of those guys, you know, growing up. Cause I grew up in a environment where I had a family member who was a coach and a, you know, so, you know, so I think, yeah, a lot of that really helped that I spoke the same language and was on their side, ultimately.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. So my next question related to that is, since you were in, in scouting and draft analysis, which player that you covered, that you got exactly right in your projections through the draft?

Brian Delucia:

I think Brian Earl was, it was definitely one of those guys that I was on too early. And another one, actually, I think you'll like this one. I was on very early to, you know, to the, the Marcus, where. Hash rusher. He was from Troy and he was just a, I just thought he had just natural upfield instincts. And, I just felt like he was going to be an outstanding, you know, pass rusher in the league and, you know, it definitely turned out to, to be that way. And I don't know, I was actually just going to add something to it since we're talking about the Cowboys, I wasn't sure if you were going to ask me. Who my favorite owner was or who the nicest owner was, but said, you know, since you're a Cowboys guy, I certainly want to give a shout out to Jerry Jones. Still. Remember the first time I met him was out on the field at giant stadium. for, before a Monday night football game between the Cowboys and the giants, and, walked up to him, introduced myself and we ended up having a really nice conversation, introduced me to his son, Steven, and, you know, he was, he was just always a, you know, a very, very nice guy.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. Now I'm going to ask you a few more questions and I don't want to monopolize the conversation cause I know Selena is chomping at the bit. So, so along those lines, just now we were talking about coaches now, and we just talked about the player that you thought was, would, would exceed the trend. What player did you you thought was can't miss and miss greatly.

Brian Delucia:

Wow. Such a long time ago. Who would that have been? or disappointment or didn't live up to their potential. That's a good question off the top of my head. that one I have to have when I really have to think of it. I mean, obviously there was, there were, there were certainly, you know, more than a few out there, but, I want to, you, you stumbled me on that one, to be honest with you.

Steve Wallace:

I'm sorry. I probably any of the dolphin quarterbacks from the last like 20 years since been Reno would probably be a gas, but yeah, there were, there's definitely.

Brian Delucia:

There's definitely a few that, yeah, that did not pan out along the way. That's no point, no question about that.

Celena Muzic:

Selena, would you go back to that?

Brian Delucia:

If you could know what, I could, I could see myself someday, to be honest with you. I would, I would, I would never say never. I mean, certainly I, you know, I love what I'm doing now and, you know, and, you know, I would certainly say, you know, probably, you know, be doing it at least, you know, play another, you know, five years or so. But, you know, certainly when you're in my position, you know, you don't have a. So called, I guess you would say retire, married or anything like that. but, I w I would never say never when, I guess when it, when, when it comes to the NFL, just because of, you know, my passion for building things and, You know, I guess you'd have to say if it's the right opportunity, the right people and, and you know, where, where, where there's ultimately the right culture. It's similar to, you know, when, you know, everybody for a, I've always asked Pete Carroll, are you ever going to go back to the NFL and. You know, and, you know, some people thought eventually he would, but you know, he turned down a few, you know, inquiries. And then, you know, you sit down with the Seattle Seahawks one day and you know, you see what ownership and type of culture they want to build there and so forth. And. You know, and it just felt right for him. So I would never say never. I think it really does come down to, you know, who are some of the people I'd be working with and, and what's, and what kind of organizational culture, you know, is in place or do they want to put in place, you know, they're, you know, moving, moving forward. And there's definitely a few people that are in the league that, you know, certainly if the opportunity to work with them, Would present that present itself, you know? Yeah. It'd be, it'd be a tough, a tough conversation.

Celena Muzic:

I have another question. What advice would you give a person looking to get into doing what you do or into building or into real estate investment? What advice would you give someone who actually has no knowledge.

Brian Delucia:

I guess my answer would be that if you have no ties to anybody in the industry, today with how easy it is to contact people. I would get on social media openly and, you know, just reach out to the masses, you know, like all, you know, identify all the different people that you would want to work with and write to them, offer to work with them for free, just, you know, and talk to them about maybe some type of, one specific item of value you can bring to the table. You know, and then just, you know, and offer to bring that to the table and no, and ultimately, you know, mate, they get that yet. They understand that you're looking to learn. but I think a lot of it comes down to, you know, reaching out to a number of people that you would want to work with, you know, in a culture and an environment that you would want to work within. And I just think that's the best way to, to get your foot in the door and ultimately learn. Start building a, you know, your network and your connections from there.

Celena Muzic:

Yeah. What do you think about all these new? I know they'd have them in California at these smart homes.

Brian Delucia:

very it's it's very interesting. Although I guess it's a little bit of a controversial topic as well, because you know, with, with technology, the way it is and how everything reads everything today. you know, certainly privately as a is big issue and understandably so, you know, so I think we have this, I guess internal struggle with ourselves as a society where we want the efficiencies and we'd like those efficiencies, but how much. Freedom. Are we willing to give up how much privacy are we willing, I guess, to give up for those efficiencies? And certainly it seems like we do that quite a bit. I mean, we all have smartphones and, and we liked that. we certainly all liked that efficient. See, and, and we're, and we're, we're definitely giving up, You know, some levels of privacy on that. So it's, it's a difficult question. you know, I, and I don't know. I mean, there's no writing answer to it, obviously. I mean, you know, every, every week as a comfort level of their own, when it comes to, it comes to that, but certainly the efficiencies with, Yeah. Anything with smart technologies today? It's definitely intriguing. But like I said, at the same time, I think we have to have that discussion with ourselves in terms of, you know, what are we willing to give up for that? Sure.

Steve Wallace:

So I guess we've talked about the projects that you are developing, and I know one other, component of your business is doing financing or on the equity side and on the debt side. So could you tell us a little bit more of that aspect of your business?

Brian Delucia:

Yeah, absolutely. You know, cause yeah, occasionally there are some things that we look at ourselves on that end of the spectrum. And then also, you know, we, we have a couple of very close friends of ours, that, deploy a lot of capital that we help that out, transactions for. And then I'm also a. You know, helping on the board of a couple of families as well, that are extremely active in the market and very, very well capitalized. And, you know, actually just the other day, earlier this week, we, we just put together a code GP offer. for a, a roll up for a very specific, industry strategy and the, lower middle markets, traditional type of, industry. And, that was something that, are really very, very good. sponsors are extremely talented. They, they're well-grounded they haven't, you know, they have an excellent, Strategy of what they're doing, and there's a lot of scalability to it moving forward. And ultimately, you know, we presented an option to them that, you know, it's not only going to provide them significantly more capital than what they were looking for. That's going to be able to scale them up. you know, certainly much more efficiently and probably a little bit more accelerated, you know, then what they, you know, and, you know, probably could realistically do if they were working with maybe somebody that was just giving them what they need today, but also bring in some really good strategic value along the way. Well, so I mean, but nonetheless, I mean, You know, the overall focus, you know, is always looking for good quantifiable scenarios that are supported by tangible right assets. You know, whether that's, you know, in the real estate sectors or, you know, traditional operating companies or other, you know, esoteric, you know, scenarios that, you know, like I said, meet that, you know, quantifiable type of status and, And have, you know, some real assets.

Steve Wallace:

So, so we have a lot of our listeners are in the multifamily realm. And I guess I have a two part question. My, my thought is what, what is your projection? What's your analysis of the current state of the multifamily arena and what's your projection in the next year. And then also is that a sector that your group would invest in and, if you give the types of things that you're looking for, Well, multifamily real estate.

Brian Delucia:

You know, it has always been a very active factor going back to my days and. back in the day in Pennsylvania. so multi-families always going to be a big part of, you know, what we're doing and, but, I guess I, a couple of different thoughts with it. Yeah, certainly we're still early in the game in terms of seeing what the fallout is, you know, you know, all the, you know, the economic transition that we're going through right now. so it's a little difficult to say exactly how things are going to play out, you know, in the, in the multifamily sector, just depending upon, you know, how much additional, I guess government intervention were. We're going to see and how the banks are gonna work with asset owners and ultimately, you know, just, you know, what employment situations are going to be, you know, over the months ahead. But I, I, my my guess is probably the, you know, down the street stretch, run it this year and, you know, Q one of 2021, we certainly are going to see some fissures, you know, it. You know, and cracks emerging in the, you know, the multifamily, you know, sector, especially, you know, and, and probably people who follow me, you know, on social media. And also I've talked to, you know, talk to me on a regular basis over the last couple of years, know that. You know, and the multifamily value add side of things like the seventies, eighties, vintage market, or, you know, when, you know, while in the secondary and tertiary markets that, you know, I just felt the last few years, and I started seeing a little bit of this in late 2016, but definitely by. You know, 17, 18 and let alone. Yeah. That, a lot of people are starting to buy these, you know, top of the market. I mean, when you see like, you know, sub five and a half cat, you know, 1970 has been through acquisition and like Corpus Christi, Texas, for example, nothing, you know, Corpus Christi. It's a growing market, a lot of, you know, population and job growth, but that's Chrissy, Texas on this podcast, but it's, but you know, it's, it's, you know, it's, you know, there's no margin for error there. You know, my, my feeling was that eventually when we do have a, you know, a transition in cycle, you know, that there was going to be no margin for air and, and ultimately there might be some struggles for institutional exits. You know, if you're, you know, investing into those assets with, let's say, you know, three to five year, you know, exit plan. And so that those were some big concerns of mine. Let me say that you always make money on the buy. Not only sell. Yeah. Well, what was happening, you know, several years ago, like for example, Yeah. Coming out of the last downturn in the market, it, you know, you were able to acquire those assets very, very opportunistically. You know, they were, there was like very compelling situations where, you know, some of these, you know, assets you were buying at like seven and a half. Eight and a half even, you know, nine and you know, we've been seeing somebody then at like 10 and 11 caps, those same assets, you know, they've been turned over, you know, and traded, you know, once, twice, even three times, you know, since that period of time, but people are still, you know, trying to. Squeeze value add I'll be raising rents. And my feeling was the last few years is there's only so far that you're going to be able to raise rents on those tenants and, you know, before you hit that breaking point. And, yeah, and I just didn't, you know, I just didn't feel that a lot of 'em people are going to meet, you know, what they at build out on their financial models, you know, getting to just, you know, vanilla type of return. Yeah. So I, I just didn't feel that those were very compelling opportunities, you know, over the last, you know, few years

Steve Wallace:

just shifting gears a little bit. Yeah. We're going to, I just want to ask you a couple of questions about, your marketing and promotion. I met Brian, through LinkedIn, right? And for those of you that aren't his connections. I really encourage you to connect with him on LinkedIn. He provides amazing content. And one of the reasons why you've gotten a lot of followers, as well as I know you've done very well. Business-wise the way that he structures his social media posts, there's no promotion involved. He just talks about very interesting timely topics. And I'd love for you to kind of elaborate a little bit on your strategy.

Brian Delucia:

Sure. You know, it's something that I've actually done that for several years. you know, where, you know, I would just post stuff that I think, you know, it gives something, people, something to think about or something to walk away from, you know, whether it's a leadership perspective, a societal perspective. And, you know, or, or even just like, you know, you know, something that, you know, whether it's in their interpersonal relationships, you know, or relationships with their spouse or, or, or business partners, or if you're part of a sports team or a business team, there's different perspectives that you can take. you know, maybe some of the things that I'm sharing on it. On a day to day basis, maybe tapping into some of my economic development, perspectives as well. so, and, and you're correct. I mean, I, I do very well. I really haven't nothing that promote, you know, per se, I'm, you know, I'm not a. I don't have a fund. you know, I'm not a capital syndicator or anything along those lines. I mean, every so often I talk about maybe something that we're doing, but, you know, very rarely do I make it about myself and I don't go on there talking, I don't mention the name Democrat Republican or, or anything like that either. that's what I follow on to, because Democrats and Republicans, they both have money that have to hire us for services. Michael Jordan actually had very prolific quote over the years. He said Democrats and Republicans, both by speaker. So I don't want to offend either. Yeah. Well, at the end of the day, You know, we're, we're all people we're right. Part of the same society. And, and the way I look at it is, you know, we have a small minority of people that are, you know, that are very, you know, that are on one end of the spectrum that are maybe, you know, radical toward one end of the spectrum. We have another small group of people that are very radical and regressive, maybe on the other end of the spectrum. And, but beyond that, we, I still believe when it's all said and done. We have a vast majority of people that. You know, we're sort of in, in that middle, you know, and they can work with one another. And, and I, I just think, you know, it's all about us working together, having conversations and listening and understanding each other's, you know, perspectives and yeah, and I think, you know, over time and, and especially, you know, some of the things that we've dealt with over the last handful of months now, you know, I, you know, even though it doesn't look like it's today, I feel like, you know, over the long game, more things, you know, we're going to come out of there. It's a better society eventually. And. And, you know, mature and, and, and, and grow as a society, or at least I certainly hope so. Yeah. But I, but I, but I, but I still have hold on. Yeah. I hope and believe in us as a society at that. You know, we, you know, that, you know, when we come together, you know, we, we could definitely, make something very special happen out there. And, and we, and no matter what walk of life, whatever our political is, our backgrounds or genders or, or, or race or whatever, we all bring something to the table. And, and we all bring something to contribute and a value. And I, and I think, you know, if we can learn how to. You know, bring all that together. you know, I, I definitely have a strong belief in what we could do as a society moving forward.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. We're going to ask you one more question each and then we're going to go to the lightning round. Alright. I'll start. Cause is gonna. Can I share the lightning round. So as we are all quarantine during COVID, what shows are shows? Have you been binge watching?

Celena Muzic:

Yeah, one of them that I really enjoy quite a bit was all of them American. it was, it was about a, a high school, you know, football player. In Los Angeles, you know, who was, I guess it was bill off of a true story. you know, he's, his, him and his family were from Crenshaw and, he had an opportunity, to, transfer to Beverly Hills, you know, for, you know, I guess you'd say just more exposure and so forth like that. And it was a really, you know, really, really interesting, No storylines, I think every weekend. And one of the things that, you know, I actually, no matter what walk of life you're coming from, that's a that's that they had two seasons of that, that I watched on my list to watch. Yes, I would recommend it to anybody because, you know, especially if you're not from that, you know, inner city environment, you know, or you came from a different culture, I think it's, I think it would be a great learning experience just to observe and yeah, listen and understand, you know, what people go through and have to, you know, the challenges and the stresses that they have in their lives every day. And I, and I think, you know, there's some really good takeaways, you know, found that for people. I think you used the correct key word is understanding the other person's walk of life, but sometimes we're so focused on ourselves. We don't really acknowledge what someone else else's like was sometimes we're so focused with ourselves and how we grew up, that we don't acknowledge exactly what another person may have gone through.

Brian Delucia:

Oh, I agree. Yeah. And today, You know, we, we just don't have enough Congressman any more with one another. And I think a lot, you know, social media, I think definitely exposes a lot more people today for what's really going on in their minds, that they were too afraid to ever say in person. And, and, and I just, and I think people are quick to get emotional on there and hit their keyboards. And we just got, we just got to get back to having conversations with one another and, and, and building that collective comradery again.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. Drum roll please. It's lightening round time, right?

Celena Muzic:

All right, we're ready. Are you ready? Okay, so you're going to answer these, you know, quickly milk or, pizza or hot dogs, pizza, Terminator, or Rambo, Terminator, eighties or nineties Christian bale as Batman or Ben Affleck as Batman. Then Aflac, you broke my heart. Okay. Joker or Catwoman. Katelyn. Okay. That's it. That's all my questions.

Steve Wallace:

Thank you so much, Brian, if you could just let our listeners know how we can find you online. Well, if you, you know, go on to a LinkedIn type, my name in, you know, Brian dilution, Arvato. And if you go to Ari Bato, llc.com, you can, view our website as well. Well, thanks so much. And you know, we'd love to have you on in the future. This went very well. And maybe in a couple of months, you can give us a post covered COVID update. Absolutely. And hopefully we'll have a college football season and we'll be able to talk some orange and some years. Yeah, that'd be great. Thanks, Brian. You're welcome.