Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast

Episode 10-Mailbox Money Featuring Chris Pomerleau, Esq.

August 26, 2020 Chris Pomerleau, Esq. Season 1 Episode 10
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 10-Mailbox Money Featuring Chris Pomerleau, Esq.
Show Notes Transcript

Join Host Steve Wallace, Esq. and Co-Host Celena Muzic of The Wallace Law Group, PL as they have the pleasure of having Chris Pomerleau, Esq. Family Law Attorney and principal of Park Ave Capital, a real estate investment firm.

Topics Include:
What does a family law attorney do?
Selectivity of law clients
Client War Stories
Advice to Real Estate Investors
What is Real Estate Syndication?
Strategies for Real Estate Investment
Outlook on Midwest Real Estate
Pop Culture and Political Banter
Lightning Round 

Steve Wallace:

we have a treat for you today. We have Chris Palmer Lu with park Avenue Capitol. Hi, Chris.

Chris Pomerleau:

I know. And Steve, thanks for having me.

Steve Wallace:

Oh, truly a pleasure. And we also have our co-hosts and Lena music. Hi, Selena. Okay, great. So Chris has the unique distinction of being both an attorney. And a sophisticated real estate ambassador. So we're going to address both topics today on attorneys are human to Selena. You want to get started as Chris?

Celena Muzic:

Oh, I want to get started. I want to know how are you doing both of those things? Cause real estate it's for me, it's a monster on its own and family law. It's like an emotional roller coaster. So to do both combined, I'm a re I'm exhausted for you already.

Chris Pomerleau:

I appreciate that. I would say drugs, caffeine That is, I have a lot of caffeine, but all jokes aside. it's just the power of delegation seriously. I mean, my paralegal's fantastic. So she really helps me, in the law office and we have a good system going already. And then within the real estate business, we just hired on, an individual. So now there's three of us that are a part of the company. And then of course, I really lean on my property managers and contractors and insurance agents and bankers. And although I'm managing them as well, that's how I'm able to kind of take it all down if you will.

Celena Muzic:

So you have a good team, very good team team. And let me ask you, how did you get into family law? I mean, you're a young guy when I think family lawyers. No offense. I think of these older guys and they just they've been through it all and they almost look beat up. Like they dealt with a lot of family stuff themselves. So, so what made you get into family law of all things?

Chris Pomerleau:

I think that that's a fair, example, of a family law attorney has been doing it for a long time. I think that if I had to do it for that long, I would also look beat up. so I was, I was yeah, in the military, from 2010 to 2013, right after law school. What's that? Thank you for your service. Thank you. Thank you. that was for three years short of that. Hmm. When I got out of the military, so I was in law school and then the military. So when I got out. I tried to find a job and they were asking for my experience. Yeah. And I could paint my face and I could sleep in the forest and I could perhaps, you know, I was really fit, but law firms didn't care about any of that. And my first opportunity was at a one stop shop, small shop though, right. A little bit of everything for about four months. And one of those things was family law. And I was lucky enough to then be hired by an a, a national outfit that only did family law. And it's kind of where I've been since 2013.

Steve Wallace:

Excellent. And what is the name of your firm, Chris?

Chris Pomerleau:

So the firm I'm at now is Nebraska legal group and I've been with them since 2017.

Steve Wallace:

Okay, great. And you primarily practice family law.

Chris Pomerleau:

It's only family law. The firm only practices family law. So divorce, custody, adoption guardianship. We only do family law.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. Great. So we Selena and I, we have a lot of questions as it relates to that. So there's question related to that. Has there ever been a client that you say, wow, I understand why this person's getting divorced and a little more detail.

Chris Pomerleau:

Okay. if anything has certainly taught me what not to do in a marriage, I'm married as well. It's my, yeah, it's mind blowing. It's really unfortunate. I mean, we're all people, right? So when you're, especially when you're stuck with being with one person for the rest of your life, and I don't mean that in a bad way, I'm saying if you're constantly around them, there are little quirks that you're going to get upset about. There are things that, you know, your fuse gets a little shorter and the ability to we'll work through some of that instead of, people leaving the commitment to make things work. Unfortunately it causes people to jump to it and. No, I'm not on a soap box here about whether you should or should not stay married, but it's become so much more socially acceptable just to kind of give up on marriage so quickly. And, that doesn't mean that people are going to divorce or quitters. I'm not saying that. I'm just saying that's why we're seeing more and more cases. So I'm certainly learning what not to do. That's for sure.

Steve Wallace:

As business picked up as a result of being quarantined together.

Chris Pomerleau:

You say that, we saw that coming. Cause that's what happened in China. And so, you know, Nebraska shut down, we practice. I also practice in Iowa as well. Cause Omaha is right on the border. and, we shut down and we got of really slow now, luckily, because of my real estate business, I was not necessarily affected, but I do know that our company slowed down a little bit like everybody did. but we had seen China go through it already and we saw their uptick of a hockey stick, right when they start, pandemic didn't stop. Cause it's, it's getting worse still. But, when they started letting people out of the house again, People spouses said, Holy cow, I didn't know a signing up to be with somebody like that. I hadn't been forced to be with my spouse that long for a long time.

Steve Wallace:

I guess my other question is, and I'm not sure if this is part of your practice. Also, I've seen a lot of statistics where there's been some domestic violence injunctions. There's been an increase of that as well.

Chris Pomerleau:

Yeah. Well, I mean, that is part of our practice. We do protection order hearings and domestic violence is part of a lot of cases, but yeah, we've certainly seen that as well. And it's unfortunate because hooping people up not only. Put stress on the marriage, but it's putting stress on everybody's mental health as well. So it's been, it's been really unfortunate. I'm not saying that our business is skyrocketing with a huge smile on my face, but I'm certainly very busy.

Celena Muzic:

Yeah. I wonder in your experience, is there a lot of, cases cause women, a lot of times nowadays are breadwinners. Yeah. So, you know, back then it used to be the man took care of the house and, you know, getting a divorce, you would have to give half to your wife. Do you see a lot of women now having to financially pony up to the ex husband?

Chris Pomerleau:

Yeah, I do. I say it's cheaper keeper. It's cheaper to keep a well, I mean, that's funny, I've never heard that I'm hearing some marketing slogans. I am seeing that now look, we're still in the Midwest, so it takes a while for the progressive mindset or just things progressively in nature to get inland, if you will. Even my things with joint custody that has just really been picked up in the last five years in this area. Whereas even only seven years ago, maybe the judges were just saying, well, mom's the better without even really dissecting the case certainly changed. So yeah. That's your question, slid it. Yeah. I'm seeing more of that financial perspective as well. With, with the wives now, earning more, they seem to be a lot better realizing that it's just going to be 50 50, and they can actually handle that. I'm seeing a lot more of my male clients, still having trouble going through the fact that they signed up for this team and just cause they earned all the money. Doesn't mean it's all there. It's the marriages, women are, seem to handle a lot better.

Celena Muzic:

Yeah. Yeah. I mean, I wouldn't, but I can see that different times.

Chris Pomerleau:

It's a team thing, right. I mean my wife is an attorney. So she has no problem making money on her own. It just so happens. She hasn't worked for two years because we have two kids under two, and sort of, she decided to stay home. And thank you. Thank you. and it, it worked for our family, but, maybe it's because I'm a divorce attorney or maybe cause I'm an empathetic person, in my opinion, a logical person that with this situation, at least, It doesn't matter that I'm making all the money. I mean, she's sacrificing and she's doing a lot for our family too, and we're both investing in this relationship. So that's the number one thing people don't realize that's for sure. Well, that's because you have the mentality of a modern day. You know, perspective. I think some of the older folks don't see it. I know you're right. I know. You're right.

Celena Muzic:

Let me ask you, have you ever had a case that you have regretted or even passed onto someone else? Because it's so, so much turmoil all the time, honestly, all the time or, or a situation where you've said to yourself, maybe these kids are better off with. Someone else.

Chris Pomerleau:

Unfortunately, I see that as well. Now, as you, as you both know, I'm an attorney and I have a job to do just like a criminal defense attorney. I mean, they may not feel the best about the client, but they have a job to do. you know, it's up to us as professionals, not to put ourselves in ethical situations where we're putting a client on the stand, that's going to lie and we know it, but, I. Who knows if my inner feelings are correct or not, but certainly I've had times where I'm like, man, my client doesn't seem like that. Good of a parent, but in the end, it's my job to kind of help them through it. And if the judge, which makes the decision, the judge makes that a shift, a decision. So, yeah, I mean, I've seen it, but I think it's attorneys, it'd be weird if, as an attorney, you have a hundred percent agreed with every client you've ever had.

Steve Wallace:

Some of the best decisions that we've made is turning down clients. The worst decisions we've made is to keeping clients and Selena and I, they are always trying to work on our procedures and it's more Selena has to protect me from myself on feeling sorry for the clients, or, you know, saying at a certain time of the month from a cat cash flow standpoint, we have to take the clients on, but. I I'm more and more. I'm just being a lot more selective in the clients that we take on and just sticking to the areas that are profitable, as well as sticking to the areas that, you know, we enjoy doing, which are real estate closings and bankruptcy.

Chris Pomerleau:

Yeah. I'm much more selective. I don't want to sound like, especially cause I have a boss, so I don't want to sound like I'm passing up on so many opportunities to, for the firm to make income, but. There are times where I will pass it off on somebody else. I mean, if you can tell that it's going to be a headache or ultimately, especially in family life, you can tell that they're the way they're viewing this case is just so backwards that you're not only are you not going to have a happy client the entire time, but the result's not going to be what they want. it just seems it doesn't seem to make sense or to be perhaps even a good business decision to take that client on.

Steve Wallace:

That's excellent advice, Chris. And the other thing I wanted to tell you is that certainly the best decisions you make oftentimes are not taking those clients out. I agree with you. Okay. So I have another question for you. My question is what techniques or lessons did you learn in the military that you're now applying to? Both of your businesses?

Chris Pomerleau:

Yeah, that's a good question. I actually had to answer that question just recently. I. the discipline factor for sure. I know that the military is known with discipline. It doesn't mean everybody in the military has disciplined, but it certainly instills discipline or strike as a discipline and people that may need a, it helps no matter what I guess is what I'm trying to say. So with that being said, when I'm juggling 60 family law cases and I'm juggling $40 million in assets under management, it can get easy to get lost in the sauce. And I think the ability to wake up early and there's another military thing that I had to learn, and kind of set my goals out and then prioritize. I think that's kind of helped helped me, in my life after the military. So I would say discipline, number one.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. Excellent. So let's transition a little bit. So I guess my next question is. You're a full time attorney. How did you get into the real estate business? And can you tell us a little bit more of the exact nature of park Avenue capital? yeah. I, with many professionals, I quickly learned that there is, there is certainly something that is real called the golden handcuffs and I'm, I don't want to sound on a pathetic to anybody who went through a hard time, I now, but.

Chris Pomerleau:

Many attorneys, not all for sure, but many attorneys, if they're making good financial decisions are relatively financially comfortable, especially to other people who have a lot harder things to go through. But I learned quickly. okay. I was hired by that national chain in 2013 and I worked so much and I made it good money, but I realized that the minute quite literally, the minute I stopped working, I stopped making money. And that freaked me out a little bit. I was seeing the things that families were going to, where one of the spouse had to work all the time or one of the sons didn't have a chance to spend time with their children, or I've seen other attorneys, even who you can tell that old decrepit attorney who's just hates the world because they've been doing this one thing their entire life. And it's like, I don't want to be that person. If I'm going to be an, a attorney that I want to choose to be an attorney. Not because I have to, because I want to. And that's kind of the role that I took. That's kind of the mindset I took starting in 2013. And I knew the only way to accomplish that was with passive income. And I knew the best passive income, was through real estate. So that's why I'm here. Mailbox money, right? Mailbox money. It is the most. I always hate, I always sound like a, kind of a jerk saying that, but when you wake up on the fifth and all of a sudden, a large amount hit your account, you didn't do anything for the last 30 days. I don't know how someone couldn't get excited about that. No, of course we have put a lot into work. Yeah. And to get into that place, but we have box money. Does those exist?

Celena Muzic:

So, let me ask you, did you start by buying properties and just charging rents? I mean, teach me, cause I want to wake up on the fifth. We're writing this, you know, when I grow up, I want to be like, you. Mailbox money and nice paintings in the background of our video.

Chris Pomerleau:

Great. Well, now I still like an insensitive. no, not at all. We love you, Chris. You're our new best friend. You're gonna earn mailbox money. I'm like, I love this. Teach me more. Okay, well fair enough. mailbox somebody doesn't have it on on day one. That's her. Dang. Sure. You don't just say I want in real estate that it happens now. It can happen for many passive investors. meaning. If you choose the right partner and you put in your money, it's just like the stock market is much better. But what I mean is you can see a return on day one. You can see your asset be worth more on day one. So for us, we started with single family homes and. I didn't know what I was doing. I just knew real estate was right. And so in 2013, we bought our first single family home and my dad is salt of the earth. He could build a home out of. Twigs and rubber bands, he could do anything. And I am the exact opposite. I cannot fix anything. I pay people to change my oil. I don't think about it. I don't want to think about it. I'm not, I'm not a handy person, so that allowed us to spend time together. But the problem was it took us a year to fix up this home, run it out and then move on to the next one. And four years later, we had four single family homes that made like $200 a month in cashflow. But we had spent four years in every weekend on a second job and I wasn't leveraging anything. And in 2017 is when we formed park AF capital and said, something's not right here. And that's what I jumped into multifamily. And since then we've acquired or almost almost 800 units in just three years. Whereas opposed to four years, it took me to get 40 units. So, wow. That was a very long answer to your question, Selena. Nope. No. Alright. Multifamily, I'm writing this down multifamily. I mean, I could just talk forever about the reasons why it's important, but the reason it's benefits beneficial is that, you know, if they have 50 units in a building and five people leave, you're still 90% occupied. So you're still getting income from 90% of the people. The risk is it's allocated a lot more. There's a lot of student me a lot less. If the, if you have more units spread out. Yeah. You're going to get the risks. If you had a single family home and they leave, you're now 0% occupied. So that only makes sense. Yes. If I could look backwards, maybe I'd change some things, but I also learned a lot. But it's all about multifamily investing. And so now what we've done is when I say leverage and partnering and all that stuff, not only am I no longer swinging the hammer myself, I'm hiring experts to do that so that I can turn it quicker. But I'm also tech we are taking on partners. Yeah, I don't, I'd love to say it was me, but our $40 million in assets, under management, it's not like I wrote a $40 million checklist itself. We take on partners, we take it, we syndicate our deals. And so they're able to get into these properties. They don't have to worry about swinging the hammer or dealing with bugs or yeah. Dealing with tenants and then quarterly or monthly, they get their passive income and it's truly passive, but we have taken us a long time.

Steve Wallace:

Could you explain to our listeners that aren't familiar with the term? Could you tell us what real estate syndication means?

Chris Pomerleau:

Yeah, for sure. Well, I am an attorney, but I'm not an sec attorney, so I'm not legal advice here, but we do, we do handle those types of matters, but just for the novice investor, again, this is purely for informational purposes. We're not giving legal advice. Well, so, so. It's easy when my dad and I were buying properties, him and I would partner on something. We were both active in it. And if someone called at 1:00 AM fixed, it would be one of us or both of us. And that was the partnership syndication came where we started taking on money from either very passive partners or partners. We didn't even know they had money to give us. And, obviously, you know, this much better than I do Steve, but. With the STC wanting to protect these investors. Of course, they wanted to make sure that we were dealing with that. We all knew what we were getting into. So we had to sign documents stating that they understood it was a risk, but it's a passive investment. I understood. I had to take care of them by checking a bunch of boxes. And that is what allowed us to grow so quickly is that everyone's kind of protected by this legal box of the FCC. and. It allows them to be protected. So I can't just run off with their money. That's not a guarantee that someone couldn't do that, but there's certainly much more protected. And then it also makes me sign up to admit, I know what I'm doing and I'm going to protect them as well. Was that a decent exponent?

Steve Wallace:

That was a very sound explanation. So generally speaking, if you have a new project, what is the minimum investment? That an ambassador could get into. And also just, and again, I know every transaction is different, but just give us an idea of what the financial reward would be if I would invest in one of your projects.

Chris Pomerleau:

Well, I think it's easiest to explain it with a round number, like 100,000. Now, most of our, most of our investments, the minimum is 50,000, but we've certainly take on, we've taken on people at 25, but usually our minimum is 50,000. you might have 20 people, right? And on the investment all at 50,000 and then you buy a property, but it's, it's easily or easier to conceptualize the financial portion. If we use a round number, like a hundred, so someone invests a hundred thousand with us. And the way we structure that deal is they get a preferred return. Meaning. There's no guarantee that will be a return. Hopefully if you're choosing the right syndicator, you are going to get one, but any return that does exist, that passive investor, whose title, they limited partner because they're not really active. They're just there they're limited partner. They get the first 7% of the return. So if throughout the entire year, the cashflow comes out to be exactly $7,000 in relation to their a hundred thousand. They get all of it. We get none of it. That's the risk we take. So we better know what the heck we're doing because we don't actually start weaving the general partners or the people who are active in it. We get money over that preferred return, and that is where we'll divide, whatever the additional amount is. So a hundred thousand dollars investor will get the first 7%. And then anything over 7%, most of our deals, we structure a 70, 30 split, meaning that the passive investors still gets 70% of anything over 7%. And us as the GP, we get 30% of that. Now we structured it many different ways, where there's a 7% preferred to the LP. And then the next 3% is preferred to the GP. And then anything over the 10% is 70 30, but either way, that's roundabout way we do it.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. Great. And so that really is a good opportunity for a lot of investors to diversify their portfolio. do you guys also accept, retirement funds like IRAs and things like that? Do those investors invest in your projects?

Chris Pomerleau:

Well, in fact, we see that's becoming more and more popular because people are, I'm not here to crap on the, on the stock market. If I had to choose one or the other, I choose real estate all day, hands down, no question. I'd already won. Real estate and me too. It's safer. It's I think it's way safer. It makes sense. The returns are through the roof, but there's, I also have financial advisors and people in my family who, who care about the stock market. So I'm not trying to trash it. What I'm saying is I think it's important to at least diversify. So if you have someone who has a good save up and they're in there, And their investments through the stock market. I don't think it's smart to have all of it in the stock market. You can then use some of that money and you can actually invest in some of these syndications. Now I'm not a financial advisor, so I'll let people ask these, are we giving financial advice on this podcast? But this is just for informational purposes only. So the way our investors do it is they work through a qualified person who can help them. Self-direct. One of their investment accounts, their IRA. Yup. So for round numbers, let's say for some reason they have $200,000 in the stock market and they want to choose a hundred of it to start investing in syndications. They would bring which that a hundred off into a self directed IRA. There are other ways to do this. And then that IRA will actually invest into the syndication. Now, any returns will go back into that IRA, but it's a way to use that money, to, to, to gain returns outside of the stock market. They can self-direct it into something else. And that's how we're actually seeing that from a lot of people. That's okay.

Celena Muzic:

Let me ask you if someone wanted to invest. I'm with you. How do people go about that? A lot of people want to get into real estate or aspects of real estate. And they're like, well, who do I call? Or if I want to put money toward anything, they don't really know where to go. So do they just, they call you and say, Hey Chris, I got $50,000 here for you.

Chris Pomerleau:

You know, honestly, with social media and how easy it is to get ahold of people. Now I'm on the phone a lot and. if it's somebody who knows what they're doing, meaning if they've had a little bit of experience in real estate, especially if they've had experience in syndications, they know how it works. And so they kind of call me just to get a feel for me, because in all reality, even though people are investing in real estate, they're really investing in this sponsor. Yeah.

Steve Wallace:

And how do we go? That's with you? What's that, how do we get in touch with you? I'm sure you, if you want to let our listeners know your various social media accounts and we'd love to promote that. And we'll, we'll also in the show notes include that as well. So if you could let our listeners know.

Chris Pomerleau:

Yeah. Chris at park Avenue, investing.com. That's my email. you can find me on LinkedIn at Chris Palmer Lu. Our website is park Avenue, investing.com and there's plenty of, items in there you can fill out, which will notify us that you're interested. We also have a free [email protected] I suggest people check that out. It's just a free report that kind of explained some questions. You should ask somebody if you're interested in partnering with them. And that's something that we offer to two people as well. Excellent. Fantastic.

Steve Wallace:

So what particular areas of the country do you invest in? And if you could also give us a snapshot of what the market looks like in those areas.

Chris Pomerleau:

we're in the Midwest. We started in Omaha, by the fact that we live here, we obviously realized since we were very lucky to be investing in the Midwest, it's not volatile like the coasts and it stays. Pretty consistent. So we're now, about we're in a three year, our radius of Omaha. So we have properties in Omaha. We have properties in Kansas city. We have properties in Sioux falls, South Dakota. We're moving into the Des Moines market. We like it. To be relatively close so we can drive there and check things out, but not so far away that it takes a lot to get there and there. So we like the Midwest is cause like I said, it's less fall at all. Still population growth in many of these cities and you're not playing the appreciation game. I'm not buying something in San Diego. Hoping that a doubles in value next next year, I'm buying something that kind of steadily increases in value, but we can force the value to go even higher by running it as a business, much better. So that's why we like the Midwest. Excellent. And what is the largest property that you guys currently hold unit wise? Unit wise, 87. Oh wow. Okay. And. Or do you have some deals in your pipeline right now and has COVID canceled any deals or what are you, what are you seeing in a kind of a post COVID type of market? I feel that from a business perspective, we have benefited from COVID. I know that's a terrible thing to say out loud, but, Many of the mom and pop owners have been, come in my opinion, a little worried about what's happening in the world. So they're kind of frantically trying to get rid of their property and we've been able to buy up those properties at a good rate at a good value. It has not stopped our business. We continue to grow. And it's just changed the way we approach things. So we're certainly underwriting. These deals much more conservatively where we're planning on future vacancies, we're planning on some job loss, and if they still make sense, then you gotta take it.

Steve Wallace:

I always tell myself and I do a new investor webinar, and I always tell my new investors that money is made on the buy. So if you buy it right. You can't go wrong when you're looking to sell and obviously the lower basis, the more opportunity for growth. Yep. I've heard that phrase many times. I couldn't agree more.

Celena Muzic:

Are you seeing or preparing for an increase in potential eviction cases because of COVID?

Chris Pomerleau:

Well, they're just now letting people evict again, a month ago, we started up in this area it's different per jurisdiction. you know, we haven't seen an effect in our properties yet. I think a lot of that has to do with the fact that we are in the Midwest. I think that out of all the units, I just told you about I to answer this questionnaire. I think it's maybe three of them. Three of the 800. Wow. Okay. I have used the COVID excuse. Wow, good tenants. I think that we buy B and C class says that haven't been affected by it and we're in the Midwest. Right? that doesn't mean that I didn't have four or five or six. Maybe then maybe these tents it's just didn't pay the rent that month, but that's okay. Just kind of part of the business and they didn't utilize the car it's situation as their excuse, if that does that make sense? Yeah, we're still over 95% occupancy throughout our entire portfolio. Wow. Yeah, good for you. Cause in Florida, we're still under the eviction moratorium and we pray. I probably get, and I don't handle tenant cases unless it's like a certain circumstance and I feel sorry for them. And then Selena gets mad at me when I take those kids. But, but generally we get probably four or five calls a day. As it relates to tenant questions. And then we have a friend of ours, Jamie, Michelle Kane, who was on our podcast previously, she deals with investors in New York and the tenant laws in New York are so restrictive that a lot of folks are leaving that market. So that's so refreshing here, Chris, and we're so happy for you. Thank you. Yeah. Thank you. And so now we're going to we've, we've talked about your legal practice. We've talked about your real estate business. Now we're going to transition a little bit and get a little silly and ask a couple silly questions before we go to the lightening round lean. Do you want to start off?

Celena Muzic:

Yeah, I want to know, because I keep asking this to everyone we interview, but have you watch game of Thrones? Is anyone bingeing on game of Thrones during Kobe?

Chris Pomerleau:

I mean, I had already seen all of it before COVID yes. I think, I think that anybody who hasn't seen it as doing themselves a great disservice.

Celena Muzic:

Okay. Okay. So here's my question, John Snow or denarius target Aryan. That's really tough. I want to be as manly and awesome as John Snow. So it's kinda hard for me. To, to not say his name, but there's something awesome about dinero. So I'm going to go with scenarios. Yeah. She's got dragons, I guess that's probably a pretty big thing. Yeah, you're right.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. So during COVID what new skills or techniques have you gained? I learned how to make pizza now. I can, code a little bit. I can design websites and my social media game has definitely increased and we've started this podcast, so we're gonna go lean and I, but definitely kept busy during COVID,

Chris Pomerleau:

social media. I hate to recycle something you said, but I mean, I didn't have a LinkedIn account before coven. Well, you've done very well. You've got a lot of followers. You're doing great. That's how I met you is on LinkedIn. I know I didn't even have an account before that. Cause you know, I was in the military. Well, you, don't not, not many people in the military need LinkedIn. That's not true. But what I'm saying is I had a job and then I got out and I had a job and I just didn't really think about it like that. But now that I realized I have a business to grow, so social media in general, I mean, I haven't really ever been a part of social media. like this. So that is certainly something we're trying to fine tune, and real life coming to the realization. I don't have to get carry out every day. Cooking. We love. Yeah, we're getting better at cooking now.

Steve Wallace:

So what, what is your signature dish that you cook? My signature dish. mine's Turkey taco.

Chris Pomerleau:

So if you want to steal that one, you can nice. I'd say, you know, I've gotten really good at it, the pressure cooker. So I make a couple of things in the pressure cooker, which I know maybe people think. Kind of cheating, but, I make this, this it's like this, healthy Quito taco mix. And then I make this Indian dish called saga S a G. Ooh. Yeah, it was my go to, I've never tried making Indian food, but I probably should. Oh, it's so good. It's my favorite. My wife's. I have the Marsala sauce at home and I just haven't been brave enough to try it yet. Oh, you have to in Indian food is if not my favorite, at least my second favorite. It's great. Yeah, it's my favorite. So. Oh, then you have to, yeah, I'm going to have to, I'm going to look up a recipe pressure, go to get online pressure, cooker, Indian food, something super easy. There's so many good things. I love it. Nice.

Steve Wallace:

So I'm going to ask, I'll ask you one last question. And my question is, and this is the debate we have on our podcast. And I'm not sure if you're a basketball fan or not, but everybody, even if you are, you're not everybody likes to weigh into it. I am the goat Jordan or LeBron. And why, because why have you seen the last dance I have? And that's a big topic on the, I'm going to tell you this and Selena's going to get all upset. So I've always kind of leaned towards being a LeBron. Advocate. And the reason why is like growing up, I played basketball and I was a big Knicks fan and Jordan used to break my team's part every year. So I had an inherent bias against Jordan, but after watching that show, Oh yeah, I mean, I've kind of, I'm at least neutral now, I think.

Chris Pomerleau:

Okay. Here, here's my. Ron George, my answer, but I think you could take LeBron and put him in a number of sports and he would be the best athlete throughout the entire sport, which is really tough to say he would be an all pro wide receiver or tied in the NFL. he is a beast. He is probably the most athletic we've seen. but. And he's also doing a lot by way of giving back, bringing a lot of his family and friends that he grew up with. And, and, he's much more socially active. Yeah. I mean, I really admire him about all of that. I really admire him. Right. But that's something Jordan didn't do. He has that famous phrase where he just Republicans buy shoes too. And I respect. LeBron for saying stuff because I don't care if you're an NBA player or you're, I don't understand why me it, Starbucks gets to voice my opinion, but LeBron doesn't, that doesn't make any sense to me. People say shut up and dribble and they should just shut up. So, but I know you're not trying to get too political here. So I'm saying that I respect everything about LeBron, but Jordan changed not only the game of basketball, but. The thought of what an actual sports role model is. The world changed because of Michael Jordan and Nike and people putting money into them. So that's why I'm giving him my vote. Okay, great. Selena, let's stick with Jordan just because he's from my era when I was younger, but the superficial reasons, I think he made the better sneaker. I think he's more likable and I think he was a better team player, like with LeBron it's it's a lot about LeBron.

Celena Muzic:

So I'm just going to judge, but I am going to ask you this. What do you think about, and I'm always getting into politics. This is why I get in trouble so much, but I'm filing. What do you think about the status of the NFL players and all these players with the Anthem and, and now. Like you said, like LeBron's speaking on there.

Chris Pomerleau:

I like it go, I'm going there. I'm always going there. I think Chris is in the military, so I'd love to hear it. I can't say that my opinion is going to match everybody's in the military, but many of the people I respect still that I know from the military, in my opinion, they know what they're talking about when they say. I did not fight me, Chris. I did not fight for anybody's freedom. I didn't go actual war. I ever heard people say this and it's true. They have fought for people too. They have their voice. And if your voices that you want to meal, which by the way, he was told to do that by a soldier anyway. Okay. If your thought is to kneel, to draw attention to something you're not shitting and a face of somebody in nom in 1972. That's not how that works. It's just to draw attention to a serious problem that we have, and it's a very respectful way. So in no way, do I take any negative feelings towards somebody? Kneeling to draw attention to something that is the reason we have a military and or that we protect our city. Everyone is protected is so they're not part of this tutorial, the dictatorship that doesn't allow them to voice their opinions.

Steve Wallace:

And so I'm all, if you want to voice your opinion that way you should be able to do it. That's an excellent answer. And that's, probably the best answer I've ever heard, especially somebody that was in the military. It's, it's refreshing to hear that. Okay. We're jumping into lightning round. You ready? Chris? I'm ready. Okay. Burgers or tacos? Burgers. Oh, interesting. Because you said your go to recipe with the taco mix. That's very, I can't cook, so it's really easy to make. Perfect. Okay. ocean or mountains. Oh, shoot. I thought you were going to say lakes. I don't know why I went there. I look, Oh gosh. Mountains. Okay, excellent. A sunshine or rain, sunshine hugs or kisses, hugs. And last but not least drum roll please. Up or down. Oh, excellent. Chris, thank you so much. And this was a great conversation and yeah. Be careful what you wish for, because we had a great time with you. We'd love to have you on in the future. Well then no, thank you very much. Thanks for having me. It's been a great talk and. Thanks for just tackling a bunch of different issues. That was fun. That's what we do. That's what we do. Okay. And could you just, before we, before we close out, could you just give us all of your social media accounts again? So our listeners, if they're interested in investing with you or if they have God forbid, if they have a family law issue in Nebraska or Iowa, they don't want my advice. They don't want my advice, cheaper keeper, just keep going on.

Chris Pomerleau:

Our website is park Avenue, investing.com. My email's Chris at park Avenue, vesting.com. You can find me on LinkedIn at, at Chris Palmer Lu. Yeah. And you know, Facebook, Instagram. I love, I could talk all day about any of this stuff. How do we get you on the gram? Cause I didn't hear, I didn't hear your. parking lot capital. Okay, great. Well, thanks so much and stay safe out there. My friend. Thank you, sir. Thanks Lena. Thank you.