Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast

Episode 13-Florida Where Everyday is a Saturday Featuring Dale Shackleford

September 04, 2020 Dale Shackleford Season 1 Episode 13
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 13-Florida Where Everyday is a Saturday Featuring Dale Shackleford
Chapters
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 13-Florida Where Everyday is a Saturday Featuring Dale Shackleford
Sep 04, 2020 Season 1 Episode 13
Dale Shackleford

Join Host Attorney Steven Wallace and Co-Host Celena Muzic in Episode 13 where the team is joined by Syracuse Basketball Legend Dale Shackleford.

Topics Covered Include:
Middle and High School Basketball Career
College Recruiting Process
Syracuse Basketball Career
Professional Basketball Career
Should College Players Be Compensated for Playing?
Should College Players Be Compensated for Use of Their Likeness or through Social Media
Jim Boeheim Stories
Who is the GOAT: MJ or Jordan
Pop Culture Banter
Lightning Round

Show Notes Transcript

Join Host Attorney Steven Wallace and Co-Host Celena Muzic in Episode 13 where the team is joined by Syracuse Basketball Legend Dale Shackleford.

Topics Covered Include:
Middle and High School Basketball Career
College Recruiting Process
Syracuse Basketball Career
Professional Basketball Career
Should College Players Be Compensated for Playing?
Should College Players Be Compensated for Use of Their Likeness or through Social Media
Jim Boeheim Stories
Who is the GOAT: MJ or Jordan
Pop Culture Banter
Lightning Round

Steve Wallace:

Okay, welcome everyone to this episode of attorneys are human too. We have our special guest today. We have Syracuse orange man. Legend, Dale Shackleford. Hi Dale. So can you tell us when, at what age you started playing basketball?

Dale Shackleford:

Well, I was probably about eight years old, any little kid, you know, in the playground, finding a wading pool and then, sandbox and just having fun as a little kid and my older brothers were playing basketball and they needed a. 10 fans. So I was the 10th.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. Excellent. And so you, were you at a, at a young age, you were always playing with older kids.

Dale Shackleford:

Yeah. I'm always playing with all the kids. I've got two older brothers that played basketball and, you know, because I grew so fast, for my age and the kids, my age. Know, they always dragged me along with them. you ever play with them.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. Excellent. And, and you grew up in upstate New York, is that correct?

Dale Shackleford:

Yeah, I'm actually originally from Utica, New York, born and raised there. I went to a private elementary school st. John, the st. Patrick's and that's the story where everything really started that because I always played organized basketball at our neighborhood center, voice flop and plant CA and we. Finally my seventh grade year, we had a basketball team at the school and between suddenly grade, we won one game out of 16. between seventh and eighth grade, I went from about five or eight to wow. Oh my God. Eighth grade. I'm 61. And you know, I had a great basketball coach, slap Constantine, and he says, you're the biggest. Guy on the court. He says, all I want you to do is let your other teammates share and you're going to be six, five. Oh, wow. I have a nephew. That's 600. Okay. How old is he? He's 17 about to be 18.

Steve Wallace:

Okay.

Dale Shackleford:

So hopefully he's got a little more time, bro. My aunt doesn't play basketball. It's never too late to start

Steve Wallace:

spoken like a true coach, right?

Dale Shackleford:

Yes, sir. Yes, sir. I was averaging 36 points a game. This is where my love and my story of basketball. I really. Took flight, American 36 points a game, and half the time with one of our games, I had four points and my dad walks in the locker room. He says, so I'm getting dressed. We're going home. He says, I don't care what it is is you're an embarrassment to your mother and everybody that's out there watching you quiet. And the coach intervening says, mr. Shannon, it's only half timing is I don't care. He was you coach my son. He goes at discipline, my son. So he made me get dressed, walk out through the gym, outside in a snow storm. And he stopped me and he says, If you can play a hundred percent, give a hundred percent effort every time that you went out there and play, and I'm crying. And I'm saying play as bizarre as I can all the time. So back then we went and played six minute chords and four points and a half time I finished in 48 and one by 11. So that's, that was my mentality from that point on is that I've got to get it or nothing at all. So,

Steve Wallace:

yeah. That's a very well known story about you online is you scored 44 points and a half. And that was that the game you're talking.

Dale Shackleford:

Yes, sir.

Steve Wallace:

Oh, wow. And so this was in eighth grade?

Dale Shackleford:

Yeah. I was 14 years old.

Steve Wallace:

Wow. Wow. So you outscored the whole, the other team by yourself.

Dale Shackleford:

I tried to, we ended up winning by 11, so,

Steve Wallace:

okay. Excellent. And so, and then after eighth grade, did a bunch of different high schools want you to recruit you and want you to come to their school? Or did you, are you already set to go to one high school?

Dale Shackleford:

Oh, it was a tough situation because, My playoffs. So my eighth grade year, my father passed away. Oh, I'm so

Steve Wallace:

sorry.

Dale Shackleford:

And yeah, my grandma's from coach became my mentor and, he talked me into going to Northern high school, which is a private school and I wanted to go to school with my brothers and sisters. 650 boys at the time was all boys school. And she said, you know, go there and say, I like it. If you don't like it, you can transfer to. And from the first day I stepped in the school, they treated me like I was one of the brothers and best friends that I had. It was like one big family with 650 boys. That's

Steve Wallace:

excellent. And so during your high school days, You played you? Cause I, I played basketball in the Syracuse area also, so I'm pretty familiar with Utica, Notre Dame. they've always been a pretty good,

school

Steve Wallace:

basketball school. how would, how was your team during those years

Dale Shackleford:

we had great teams. I was fortunate enough my freshman year. I started out on JVs and then the last five games of the season I played varsity. And then my sophomore year, we had a great group of guys. And we know we played, you know, powerhouse teams throughout the state, so we had a lot of experiences. our league was called the CLL league, and, by son ended up being the leading score conference. we've always had very good teams second round or whatever. And then my senior year, we played the maps from, Maryland. There were number three in the country. We'd beat them. Bikes are cheap. So, you know, we play great competition. We've always said good teams. You know, we played ball together. It was no big thing about, you know, who's going point shows doing what, because one of my high school was I had four points, 20 rebounds and 19 assists. You know, another guy in there to score 40 o'clock points that he held them with scoring record for about 30 years. So, you know, those types of games and those types of teams that I played on. Excellent.

Steve Wallace:

And so. At that point, I assumed that you were getting interest from a variety of different division. One colleges.

Dale Shackleford:

I had about 250 scholarship offers to college and, I took probably about four visits and I got tired of that. Cause it was almost every weekend then. you know, it was taking me away from my family and my friends and that. So I decided right away, my family come last week. Like my friends would come watch me play. So that was one of the major factors. other than that, A lot of the coaches that I talked to a bank that I didn't believe in my national championship. So, you know, that really, geared me towards sharing. I'll earn my plan. So that was great. you know, I was very fortunate. She accused my freshman year. I played center. I placed them all forward. My junior year, I played one, two guard and my senior. So that was because of the coaching I had growing up in grammar school and high school.

Steve Wallace:

you played before there was a three point line, correct? Yes. And even without the three point line, the scoring was pretty high.

Which for a lot, we just call it out. And we have is probably about 90 days, but three years we have had great players. My freshman year was the year that I have to show you is one of the final four and 75. And, you know, I came in then, you know, they lost that. I want to add the buy for time. And we were fortunate enough that, you know, when I came to shoot, he was a damper who wasn't too high to, guys, we had a Senator Ernie Siebert embody blogger. So, it was a choice of me and Maureen burns that it was going to play center. So Marnie was a sophomore freshman, so he chose a play, a small chord, and I ended up having to play center. Well, and then my son, we got a Roosevelt that was a big load up my back that I'm in the middle of set up.

Steve Wallace:

So, what was your GoTo scoring move? Cause you are a score throughout your career. So what was your breakdown move?

Dale Shackleford:

That was a difference between us and, we had scores. We didn't have a lot of great outside shooters and everybody wants me to shoot her. And to be totally honest with ya. A lot of my points came off of a, you know, steals, rebounds, running out past breaks. you know, that sort of, you know, I can put them all on the floor pretty well to get to the rim and everything. But, you know, mostly my points came from male steals.

Steve Wallace:

That's great. So the hustle play you're you, you fill up the

statute.

Dale Shackleford:

Well, yeah. And taking advantage of a team's keen on other guys that, you know, gave me up to a hundred to be free. You get those opportunities. Excellent

Steve Wallace:

cleaning. You want to ask? Okay.

Celena Muzic:

Yeah. I wanted to know, how do you feel about, and I've asked this, I asked this to the coach last time, but how do you feel about college players getting paid? And while they, while they play.

Dale Shackleford:

Well, it's, it's, it's a tough situation. you know, my freshman year in Syracuse, we used to get $15 a month laundry money as they call it. And after two months into the school year, so September, October, we got $15 check to do a laundry with and to get our troll and shoes and things like that. And then the end of life stuff, we can not be treated any different than any other stewards. So they took that $15. I come from a home that had a single mom who were tired and a, you know, five siblings. No, we'd had that type of money that burden your buck. They'll do whatever you want. And, you know, sometimes it was tough. You don't try to make it the dining hall afterwards. No, that was at six 45. And then, you know, we finished breakfast at six 30, six 45, you know, you're worried about getting something to eat or. you know, going home for the holidays and stuff, you know, where it always stuck out, Players are getting paid now and whatever. I personally feel that the players deserve something, you know, with all the time you put in at practice, you don't have to go to class and they have to study in the road and things like that. It's like a full time job. And your social life and your personal life is just basically gone out the window, you know, when you asked him. So I think that should get something. I'm not saying that how much they should get or what they should get. I think across the board, it should be equal because I'm a firm believer that if you're the number one player, well, without that number 15 or 16 player, You haven't pointed a practice against to become a better player. So I think everybody should be paid equally across the board,

Celena Muzic:

not to mention all the money that universities make off of these players.

Dale Shackleford:

Well then, and people don't understand that. yeah, like department pays a university for the student athletes to attend classes and stuff. So in a way you earn that money and then that's given to you through your education. but as far as the personal time and the, the time mentioned, put it in, I think that should be subsidized. that's why I say, you know, I don't know how much they should know how much people deserve to get, but they shouldn't be summoned

Steve Wallace:

about all of the money that the university makes through the apparel. Like, for example, if you're, what was your number in school?

Dale Shackleford:

Okay.

Steve Wallace:

So let's say they're selling a lot of Syracuse, 33 uniforms. You're not getting any of that money. I think it would, in my opinion, I think it's fair because people are buying 33 Syracuse jerseys because of Dale Shackleford. And you're not seeing any of that money. You should get at least some of it. And some of the legislation going around and some, you know, a big push where athletes can share in some of that revenue. What are your

thoughts?

Dale Shackleford:

That would be great, but me personally, you know, they give me two free tickets, I guess it takes care of

Steve Wallace:

well, that's worth, at least as an alum, you get two free tickets to every home game.

Dale Shackleford:

Yes. And then sometimes, you know, they compensated some tickets and things like that. But I think they deserve something. you know, it was different when we played, you know, we did a lot of traveling and stuff, but nowadays, you know, these guys it's like a full time job. And they're constantly in the gym. They're constantly in treatment for one reason or another. We didn't have that back when I was in school. So to be perfectly honest with you, I do feel that those guys deserve something. The ones that I plan now in this era. And, you know, guys like myself, but no rules, no change in the game changes. Yeah.

Celena Muzic:

Well, what about players using social media to make money? I mean, they're not necessarily going through a university, but they have these social media pages and easy to make money off of social media because people who want to market through your site and, you know, depending on the amount of time, I don't see anything wrong with them. A player. Who's a very good player using his social media platform to make some type of income, but apparently the universities consider that a problem.

Dale Shackleford:

Well, I mean, NCAA has it where a student athlete can not work while I'm in school. So in a situation where a family can't afford to take care of their child, they should have a way to make money without actually having to do some type of. No with them doing the social media that should be open and they shouldn't be free to do whatever they like to go out and do a physical job. you know, saying, you know, I go to the grocery store. I, I understand what I don't want you to do that they don't want you to put yourself out in the limelight. But as far as the social media is concerned, they shouldn't be able to. And some places can be smart about it. And then there's ways around it. You know, the way social media is today, I can put it in somebody else's name and, you know, the university has got a pile of the incident, AA rules, as long as he gets stopped by the cops. Okay,

Steve Wallace:

great. So in college, who would you say the toughest person you guarded?

On the

Steve Wallace:

opponents,

Dale Shackleford:

everyone, I learned a long time ago that anyone is capable of scoring on any one minute and then they get in bed. So my, my biggest thing right now is I tell kids all the time, you have to pay attention to the scout or your coaches work to tails off 24 seven to prepare you for game. And don't go out there and plugging that because. A team lost by 50 against someone else that you're going to go out to beat the beat that you still have to go out and put the effort or to get some great players. I played against any Jordan, James Bailey, Bernard King, or any Grunfeld, you know, we played against good bladders. and every player could go out and meet you. I mean, I didn't know anything about Jim Baxton until he kicked my butt for 35 points when we played dating. So, you know, those things like that you'd have to pay attention. So you just gotta be in court. You, you have to understand that under any given day, you know, somebody can have a great game against you. So you got, was

Steve Wallace:

Irvin Johnson magic when you played against him.

Dale Shackleford:

It was just starting to become magic, but, we had a player named Marty burns that, took the one in front of him on that. Here you go. Yeah.

Steve Wallace:

He played in the NBA for a while, right, Marty. Okay,

great. He played with the Lakers. Oh wow. They won the world championship. Okay,

Steve Wallace:

great. So after college, you played professional. Overseas. Can you tell us a little bit about your journey and let us know which country you enjoyed the best? Because I know generally when you play overseas, you go to a variety of different countries in Europe and around the world. Well,

Dale Shackleford:

I got drafted by Phoenix suns on a college and I got covered and I had a travel boss at Borland, a couple, both of those teams. And then I had a trout without And that can come from them after three weeks in their camp and everything. So at the time I decided, well, I guess my basketball career is over.

Steve Wallace:

Can I ask you a question about the Harlem globe Trotters? Did you learn like all the different tricks that they do in practice, or I'm just always curious about that. My son loves watching the Harlem Globetrotters on YouTube. So he's fascinating.

Celena Muzic:

Or is that like a

specialty team that does tricks?

Dale Shackleford:

Yeah, they they've got certain guys that do all those tricks and they've gotten to guys like me to just go out and play basketball.

Celena Muzic:

They were a separate team. Yeah. But

Steve Wallace:

isn't it true? Isn't it true? The team that they play against, they know they're going to lose.

Dale Shackleford:

Well, I don't know. I never got that far over the years.

Steve Wallace:

Got it. Okay, sorry to interrupt. So then you,

Dale Shackleford:

I got a job working for a Kemper insurance in the marketing department. I was with them for about a year. And, I went from a two, one 15 pounds pounds. You know, this isn't for me, I need to do something. Brendan Malone was the sister coach. And that was a year that Marty had Eddie Ross. Chris those guys were graduating, so they had a free agent trial camp. So I got invited to that, workout with them to get placed in Europe and South America. And that so long story short, I went to try out so many thing and nothing happened. Nobody talked to me and coach alone came up to me and he says, but anybody talked to you. I smell it's an origin. He goes, he goes, do you want to play somewhere? And I said, yes, I'll take care of it. So I went home on a Sunday, Tuesday phone call from an agent we're in all the paradise. He said, would you like to play in Chile as a share? I just want to play anywhere he goes. Okay. So what ended up happening is that I agreed to go with show, but then I got an offer to go. So I ended up going to Italy for one year. And the chamber in spending

Steve Wallace:

in Italy, I played

Dale Shackleford:

in a town called It was just North of Rome, a little bit in the Hills. And, after that season, I ended up getting back in touch with her and he says, okay, let me get you back with all the paradise and see what he's got for her. So that's. So I ended up more in Chile for two years. Love it there. My first season there, we won the championship. I have went to my second season most when they started the revolution. They're trying on what's over dollar now we'll do it. So I left early. And I said, John, I can't get caught up in this. And I'm Bernie and says, well, they're looking for two guys to play in England, Marty hadn't Lyla. Get her rooms are flying now, Atlanta. And I ended up being on for 10 years. And then my last two years, I was a player coach and a tomboy. But during that 10 year period, I was able to tour a lot of, Europe, a coach named Bob hope of coastal Merman, bullish the guys on a tour to Spain and tomorrow at the end of the season. So I got to go there and, Belgium, Austria. And the guy, I got to a point where I actually finally had enough of basketball. So Angie too, you know, I hold my shoes as a professional player and I went back home and just played in a few rec leagues and worked and got involved in coaching. Good friend He was the athletic director through the college. And he invited me to be the assistant coach of basketball. That's where my actual culture in the States started.

Steve Wallace:

Excellent. Are you a golfer?

Dale Shackleford:

I try.

Steve Wallace:

Not very well.

Celena Muzic:

are you actively coaching?

Dale Shackleford:

at the moment, I just got awkward to be an assistant coach at cargo Gibbons out of Fort Lauderdale. And then also, coach, Roosevelt gray. He has a traveling team here in Boca and, he's a good friend of coach fine. And he invited me to help his team out, right now, along here, over the summer. And we just traveled to, Atlanta over the weekend and the kids played

Steve Wallace:

I have a fourth grade travel team in Boynton beach that may want to assist you enlist your services.

Dale Shackleford:

Oh, anytime, just let me know.

Steve Wallace:

cause number eight, he's pretty good on, on that.

Celena Muzic:

Dale. Let me ask you, how do you feel about coaching during this pandemic?

Dale Shackleford:

Well, I, you know, I, I wear the mask all the time. It might be a girl at the table in the gym. I try to be as safe as possible. I think that we need something to occupy our mind and. you know, a disease or someone's gonna attack you or affect you. It doesn't matter what you do to try to prevent this it's of happen. I just think that everybody stays safe follow protocol and doing what you're supposed to do as far as your hygiene is concerned. And you're not being safety with the basket. I think that, you know, we'll have time enough to find it back so we can get back to some sort of normalcy.

Steve Wallace:

Great. Well, Selena and I are going to ask you one more question each and then we're going to go to the lightning round. So my question is in one of the big debates that we have on this show, after watching the last dance, the question is who's the goat, Michael Jordan, or LeBron

Dale Shackleford:

James Michael Jordan.

Steve Wallace:

Okay.

Celena Muzic:

See, I knew I would like you, Dale.

Dale Shackleford:

Well, I I've seen, I seen Jordan over the years and Jordan with his work ethic and stuff made his team better. Okay. My version of LeBron, LeBron is searching for players to make it seem better instead of making the players around him, that he already has. And that was the difference. I draw the line between Michael Jordan graduates.

Steve Wallace:

Give a follow up question though. So one difference though, between the two of them is Michael Jordan would pretty much toe the line. He wouldn't make any controversial statements or comments, anything related politically, the difference is LeBron. James is pretty big proponent of social justice. So I'm just wondering what.

Dale Shackleford:

Well, I'm going to stay out of that because politics and I'm trying to stay away from, you know, all this going on right now with black lives matters and things like that.

Celena Muzic:

Okay. My question is, what do you think of how the NBA is today as opposed to back when. Even I was younger cause I remember tiny little shorts.

Dale Shackleford:

Well, the game's changed. and I think it's because of the European, influence on the game. Most of your peer glitters are outside shooters. you know, everybody's a three point shooter and that goes from your big civil smallest. that's the way the American game has changed now is because every player now wants to shoot the three point shot. And me personally, I think that was a worst day to get out and put in the game was a three point shot because it's on the shoot and, you know, even kids today, I tell them if you can shoot at least very tight, a 30 pack of scent. Well, the three point line don't take that shot. It hurts your shipping centers, but as soon as a child Walsh. Yeah. so I think the game as laws, you know, the actual basis of the game, as far as you know, I haven't met him inside a center. and you have very good inside, outside game. Now everything's on a perimeter and everybody just wants to run it up there. There's no real defense in the game and there's no real structure on the offense.

Celena Muzic:

Okay. And then just to add to that question, what do you think of the women's basketball team and equal pay as well? For the women's team. I mean, they are, I've watched and those girls could play.

Dale Shackleford:

I think that's where the game should go. I think all young players should watch the women's game more because they're more on the mentally sound. they work harder on trying to do the easier things and the right things. It's not all about the fancy stuff is all about jumping this high, as you can jump, you know, I tell the kids now, you know, a shot goes up and you gotta locate someone in a box and. I go back to Syracuse all the time. Right now, the circus gets out. We bought a lot because they don't box out. And even though they still have those box on principles that you have to unleash before you give it the rebound, instead of turning and thinking to go use your athletic ability or jumpy passing skills and everything like that, you know that these kids should watch the women's game because they. Do take the time to get the fundamentals, right? And then they put those fundamentals in a game situation and that get in the game. And now all of a sudden they want to deviate from that and forget about the fundamentals. They put the fundamentals in play. When I play that, I actually

Steve Wallace:

have, you have some of your comments. Bird my inquiry. So you, when you started, coach Danforth was the coach at Syracuse, but, but they was your assistant and Bernie fine. So you were there when you, you were one of the first players to play when Bay Heim became head coach, correct?

Dale Shackleford:

Yes. Bernie plan then become an assistant until may have took over.

Steve Wallace:

Sorry, I didn't mean to rub. So what is your, what is your funniest Jim Boeheim story you have for us

when

Steve Wallace:

he shared a couple of funny ones with us when he was on,

Dale Shackleford:

well, you know, everybody always asks me that my biggest thing was, you know, I go to practice, I get my two and a half hours and then, you know, excuse my expression. You, I try not to be around the coaches unless I actually had to. and we avoid those personal relationships because I'd never wanted to be in a situation where I'm gonna get in a confrontation with another player because I was or not. But we did have an incident on the road. We beat Louisville at Louisville, my sophomore year. And, we had a little party. Hotel rooms. And one of the players took all the pieces and lined them up from Kobe and his door until the elevator. When he got up in the morning, he kicked all these beer cans over it. So we get back. You get up in the morning for breakfast and everybody's looking around each other. And coach, didn't say a word. Rather than applying, not a word we're on the bus from the Syracuse airport to the field house. All of a sudden it goes away. You get to the field of the house. He goes, everybody dressed him. So we give them to the field house everybody's dressed. Nobody has said anything. We're going to run the stairs. So now we're running the stairs for 20 minutes. Come down. He says, who put the beer cans outside my door. Nobody answered. Back on the stairs. Again, another 20 minutes they come down last time, put the beer cans outside my door and he looks around and he goes, okay, you go shack. You can go home. He goes over, there goes up on the stairs. You put them there, you have a sense of that by numbers. You don't like the run. So I got to go home. Everybody asked him.

Steve Wallace:

That's okay. Last question, before the lightning round. So you lived in Utica most of your life. So I'm just wondering, what would you say is your favorite part of Utica and your least favorite

part of Utica?

Dale Shackleford:

Well, my favorite part of Utica is just a friendship that I have with, you know, the whole city and the community. Doesn't matter what side of town I go on and where I'm at. People always show me the rock. The worst thing about unity. And I keep saying that we, we had a baby influential on building prisons and we tend to let a lot of the criminals out and the Munich area. Now they've resettled there and now know they're destroying the city. Same things happened in, in Syracuse and allowed places that I have no problem with anyone where they live and where they come from, how you treat people and how you treat the city that you're living in. And people that come out to, you know, this is all before what's going on now that people can not show in the cities with the drugs and stuff like that. Because when I came home at 92, there were more unfamiliar faces in Unica. They weren't familiar. There was more drugs around there then, you know, I seen them five drugs. So, you know, and, and saying that, you know, we need to clean it up and we need to stay strong in every city to where, you know, this is your home. Let's make sure that nobody else comes in the mistresses.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. Great. And so now you're a Florida resident. What made you, and you live, you live in Delray beach, which is right near us. and what made you, what made you decide to come down to Florida? Well,

Dale Shackleford:

in Florida every day is like a Saturday. The weather's nice. Just enjoy life. You know, my significant other crystal and I we'd come down. We're going to go to three years a week where I come down, probably maybe six or seven times during those three years, about a month and a half ago, we were down here for two weeks and we looked at each other when we were going home Sunday, we said, why don't we just moved to Florida? And we got a home Sunday night, Pandora things. I ran into you all trailer. I hook it up to the escalated Tuesday morning. We were driving to Florida and here we go.

Steve Wallace:

Well, we're happy to have you and it's okay. Is it okay if I borrow Florida where every day is a Saturday? Okay, Sally, do you want to take us home with the lightening round?

Celena Muzic:

Sure. Sure. Okay. So I'm going to ask you a few questions and you're just going to answer them without any thought. Okay. Okay. So, sunshine or snow. Gotcha. Okay. did you watch game of Thrones? Oh, my goodness. Nobody watches game of Thrones anymore. Okay. Top Ben show you're watching right now. Nine one, one. Okay. Okay. Cheeseburgers or tacos? Cheeseburgers? Definitely. Okay. New York pizza or Chicago pizza. I love pizza. I think I've got to say New York pizza because that's where I was born and raised on. Right. You better stick to New York pizza. Okay. Android or Apple, Apple. Good man.

Steve Wallace:

All right,

well,

Steve Wallace:

thank you so much, Dale. If you want to promote, if you can let our listeners know again about the Willow street foundation and how they can donate to this great organization.

Yes. You can go online though. WW dot dot org, and it'll give you all the prompts and know all the information on the, you know what our mission statement is. And it will show you the charities and the things that we've done over the past 15 years. And

Steve Wallace:

then Dale, also, if you could let our listeners know to look out for you, you you've previously been a broadcast. And if you want to tell it every ever our listeners to look out for your show, that's going to be upcoming.

Dale Shackleford:

Yeah. Roosevelt pointed at myself, orange and it's on Facebook right now. And, you know, we were covering mostly, you know, Syracuse basketball men's and women's, and, you know, I'm going to be around the show down here. Are you in Florida at the moment? I'm looking for a venue. to have live audience, to come to and have a couple drinks and some food and, you know, we'll chit chat and we'll talk about it. We'll share it here since, past games and upcoming games.

Steve Wallace:

Well, we, we have some clients and some connections that may be interested. So we'll talk to you offline about that.

Dale Shackleford:

Okay, thank you very much for that. I really appreciate it.

Steve Wallace:

Measure. And again, we hope to see

Dale Shackleford:

you soon. Okay. Thank you. Thank you.