Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast

Episode 18-Politics Runs in the Family Featuring Florida State Representative Emily Slosberg

September 23, 2020 Emily Slosberg Season 1 Episode 18
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 18-Politics Runs in the Family Featuring Florida State Representative Emily Slosberg
Chapters
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 18-Politics Runs in the Family Featuring Florida State Representative Emily Slosberg
Sep 23, 2020 Season 1 Episode 18
Emily Slosberg

Join Host Steve Wallace and Co-Host Celena Muzic both of The Wallace Law Group, PL as they are joined by Florida State House Representative Emily Slosberg.

Topics Include:
Why Representative Slosberg Became an Attorney.
Traffic Safety
Ban of Texting While Driving Bill
Promotion of Hands Free Driving Bill
Top 5 Legislative Priorities
Mental Health Legislative Issues
COVID-19 and Unemployment Issues
Advice to Female Interested in Running for Office 
Pop Culture Banter
Lightning Round



Show Notes Transcript

Join Host Steve Wallace and Co-Host Celena Muzic both of The Wallace Law Group, PL as they are joined by Florida State House Representative Emily Slosberg.

Topics Include:
Why Representative Slosberg Became an Attorney.
Traffic Safety
Ban of Texting While Driving Bill
Promotion of Hands Free Driving Bill
Top 5 Legislative Priorities
Mental Health Legislative Issues
COVID-19 and Unemployment Issues
Advice to Female Interested in Running for Office 
Pop Culture Banter
Lightning Round



Steve Wallace:

we have a true pleasure today. We are joined by Florida state representative, Emily Slosberg. Hi, Emily. I see. Thanks for having me today. Okay. And as in the title, we're called attorneys are human too. And like myself, you're also a licensed Florida attorney. So I guess our first question for you is what made you decide to become an attorney?

Emily Slosberg:

Good question. we all get in, we all go to law school or become an attorney for different reasons. my reason is really personal. I ha eye towards running for state office, being a legislator who drafts and creates and votes on laws. And in 1980, it's a very tragic story. I was involved in a car crash. I had lost my foot and I was almost killed. And. Growing up, it's a unique thing to have a twin sister. It's a very unique bond and you're close with Joe to bed when we shared everything. And I honestly could not imagine one day without my sister. And then what happens is we get into this massive crash. There were seven of us in the backseat of a two door Honda civic. The driver was nine years old and he was driving. He was seat belted in his friend up front was seat-belted in. The car we had hit, they were all seat-belted in it. And it turned out, after the 90 mile an hour crash out of the seven of us sitting in the backseat without seatbelts five are dead. Including my twin sister. Yeah. And I'm the only walking survivor of the backseat. And when I remember getting out of that hospital or in the hospital, and I didn't know what had happened, it's, I had no idea. I was in a lot of physical pain and I noticed that I had not seen my twin sister visiting me at the Del Ray hospital. And I said, I wrote it. I was on the respirate. I couldn't even breathe. Reader, whereas Dory sister and my father. The first time the hospital, I said to my dad, how did you get through this? How do we go on? Because I don't want to live without my twin sister. And he said to me, Emily, it's what we do after a tragedy that determines whether it remains just the trench. Wow. We're going to do everything. When I did, I got out of the hospital and I started off actually, when I graduated college, becoming a substitute teacher and taking this video about traffic safety, to all these students in high schools, letting them know the dangers of driving with, without seatbelts, with speeding, with being reckless, letting them I wanted them to personally know. I touched a lot of. Students. And then after that, I decided to go to law school and learn the laws and learn how to think the way lawyers think and, with an eye towards being in the Florida legislature. And so I graduated law school. I B I practiced for a little while I did some family laws, some employment discrimination, and then ultimately ran for office and. When my first election in 2000 States in the neighborhood that had it made this a primary fence. And so I did everything I could. I went, I don't do, I didn't do the traditional things of just filing the legislation. I filed the legislation. I visited counties and cities throughout the state getting resolutions of support for the legislation. I. Did press conferences at every city and County, meeting. I just, I F as many press conferences as possible to get, bring awareness to this issue, to bring also survivors, and also those who had lost loved ones to texting and driving. And I just, I brought together like just the community of families, members of victims and survivors, and we took it to Tallahassee and we got the legislation passed. And, it's just, it just has recently been passed. And my next major issue is going to be the hands free in the car to require him.

Steve Wallace:

Because I remember the community organization that I'm involved with, that we were a big advocate for. And I believe that the last, the bill that you're talking about that passed during two sessions ago, Yeah. And so if you could just lighten our listeners, if you could go into a little more detail on the bill that, God willing you'll get reelected in November, the hands free bills, if you could go into a little more detail.

Emily Slosberg:

So the current law says that the currently you can be pulled over if you are caught texting and driving. So if you're texting, driving on the roadways, but you're holding a phone to your ear, You, if you're holding the phone to your ear, you're not violating you. you cannot be pulled over. Cause you're, if you're permitted to talk on the phone or hold the phone to your ear, however, currently under in school zones and an active construction zones, you cannot hold the phone to your ears. It's hands free in school zones, active construction zones. So what my bill would do would make it hands free. So you cannot be holding the phone to your ear while driving. Everywhere. So it wouldn't be only applicable in those specific areas of the school zones or active construction zones. And I think this is something it's not a big. Leap, because it's already the law in certain areas where we have more vulnerable people where we have construction workers and young kids walking, vulnerable kids walking. So I think this is something that our state is ready for. And it's not like we're going ahead of all the rest of the States, because there are a plethora of other States that have already passed this legislation.

Steve Wallace:

It seems like common sense. And I'm just wondering why our state is behind the curve, not out of the group.

Celena Muzic:

Yeah, I am too, because I'm from New York city and in New York city, that's standard. So when I first moved here and I see people on their phone, I used to get so frustrated because I'm like, they're going to kill someone.

Emily Slosberg:

Oh really. this is, and putting together like 16 year old drivers with a phone in their hand, it is a deadly combination. It really should be an offense that, it's more dangerous than many of the other driving offenses. And so it is common sense. and I think, I think this is a big leap. So I think we will, I'm going to do everything. I can this upcoming session again, I filed it last session and, it didn't get too much traction and I'm going to file it again, this session and every session until we get a path, I'm not going to give up on it.

Steve Wallace:

Okay, great. So just to circle back a little bit on your bill that you passed a couple sessions ago, how many sessions did it take you to get it passed?

Emily Slosberg:

It took me. I filed it in 2016. I filed it in 2017 and then 2018, we got it passed. I was, yeah, it went from not getting a hearing and never got a year in that first year. That first, session. I actually, I tried to file it as a local bill knowing that I really couldn't, but I just wanted to try to keep getting traction and just people talking about it everywhere. And so I just kept filing it every which way I possibly could. I filed it as amendments, like rules with amendments and there were not, they were not in the rules, but I just kept trying to file it on everything. Until I had it through the right way through, in 2018.

Steve Wallace:

So along those lines, obviously traffic safety for many reasons is your passion. what advice would you give to newly minted drivers on how to follow the rules of the road?

Emily Slosberg:

Yeah. So it is it, especially at that age, it's so important to really understand that something like the loss of a loved one or something like a serious injury to you can really happen. I used to think that it only happened to movies or it happens to other people, or it happens on the news. But this is something that can really happen to you, and it has a devastating effect on your family. And this is something that I have to live with for the rest of my life. I still I'm. this happened when I was 14 years old, I'm 39 and I still wear this ring. My twin sister's ring on my finger. I have not taken it off. This is something that affects will affect you the rest of your life. It has affected me the rest of my life. And there was a time too, that I used to hide under the front seat of a passenger car in the passenger seat. I was scared out of my mind to get into a car. I had broken my leg. I had punched in my long broke. My ribs. I had my leg was fractured in five different places. It was a compound fracture. I had to learn how to walk again. And this was like, this is. It's unbelievable when it happens too, but it's something that can happen. And so my advice is to wear your seatbelt. Don't not to crowd in cars, not to speed, not to text and drive, not to pick up the phone and drive because it just takes one time. It's just one time. and it's in everything changes in a second. And I would, it's just very important that we. Don't think that this cannot have it, cause it definitely can, but we need to be careful about that.

Steve Wallace:

I'm so sorry. you have to go through this, but the good news is you took a very negative point in your life and every day you're working hard to protect folks and I commend you representative on your public service.

Emily Slosberg:

Thank you so much.

Celena Muzic:

And you're making a big change in something that. We don't think of.

Emily Slosberg:

most legislation only affects a small segment of our population. It might be a business segment or know just some smaller segment, but this like traffic safety, it really affects them. All of us and our guests and our visitors, because we're all driving on the roads and it's something you're right. It's just, it's not really, you're not really thinking about it until something really bad happens to either somebody that you love or to you. It just, cause we do it every day.

Steve Wallace:

the one thing that I noticed, because I'm also from New York, I'm one of those darn new Yorkers is when I moved down here, because we have people from not only all over the country, while all over the world and the traffic laws are different. It's a pretty crazy and scary. Tasks when you're on in Russia hour, dealing with folks that look cheap, are looking in the mirror, doing their makeup on tick tock, Instagram. it's pretty scary stuff. So I'm so happy that, you're working hard to get that amendment. Yes.

Celena Muzic:

Can I ask you what your views are, because of all the technology. And now they're trying to come up with these autonomous vehicles. How do you feel about that? Because that scares me. It just scares me, but.

Emily Slosberg:

Yeah, absolutely. that is, I, me personally, I'm not there yet, but I do think that is going to be a tremendous steps for the future. I think we will get there eventually. I think that there's an argument to say that these, these. They might operate under less or they might become smarter than us individuals. This is smart cars. Are these autonomous vehicles we're not there yet. Definitely not there yet, but I think we should be looking towards that in the future for sure.

Steve Wallace:

despite the 50 50 breakdown in population. There's still not a lot of females in the legislature. So what advice would you have for a female? That's looking to get into politics and ultimately. Become a member of the Florida legislature.

Emily Slosberg:

Yeah, it's a great question. I tell you, I'm also the vice chair of the women's legislative caucus and we are a strong caucus. Like when we come together with ideas like the, in 2018 weeks, we actually got together and all decided we voted on different bills to put as our priorities and our three bills that we had prioritize, which was one of them was the texting and driving bill had actually in all three paths. So it was a great, it was great for a lot of women to come together with private. but for young women out there thinking of running, you can do it. don't let, I'll never forget. When I first in 2016, I was pretty young when I first started gardening, I would say maybe I started running in 2015. I was in my young thirties. I was my, I was in my friend and I'll never forget. A lot of, I made a lot of appointments with a lot of community leaders that were older men and, and they were like leaders of these clubs and these groups. And I sat down with them and I asked them for their issues because I wanted to know what would be important to the community when I got elected. And I just kept going. And a lot of the, I got a lot of. A lot of, I would say like condescending, some of them were conscious. You're just a nice girl. You're just a nice girl, And so I said, you know what, even if you think I'm going to win or not still going to represent you, I'm going to listen to you. I'm going to come back. I'm going to get your issues again, I'm going to work hard for whatever your, you bring up, if you bring it to me, cause that's what I'm going to do when I get elected and I ignored it. I just, I just under, I saw it and just ignored it. And it actually added fuel to the fire that you could do this. don't let anybody tell you can't because I just have, I have to just say thank you and smile to those people that kind of con are condescending and make it seem like you can't get things done, but you do it. You can absolutely do it. And I would tell you, it would encourage you to vote, to run for office. As, as many, if that was, it was something that you had believed in and had wanted to do it.

Steve Wallace:

That's Selena. You ready?

Celena Muzic:

Who knows? Okay.

Steve Wallace:

My next question that I have for you and I'm sorry, saline, I'm monopolizing the conversation. Is other than traffic safety. What five issues are you? Are you prioritizing this legislative session? And what have you been prioritizing during your legislative career?

Emily Slosberg:

Yeah, so this upcoming session, the first and foremost probably work, we're going to have to deal with the public health issues. we're also going to have to deal with. mental health has been a priority and remains a priority of mine. And given the, a lot of. there's been a lot of additional mental health issues with the COVID and depression And so I think another big issue is going to be, and I think we're going to try to address it in the upcoming session. is mental health, number three for citizens? My district. Is the second oldest demographic in the state? Yeah. And so senior citizens, is it top priority animal cruelty? It's I've actually within the last two weeks have been, actually I've gotten constituents calling me about certain animal cruelty issues that have been coming up. So I'm going to be. I have worked on it previously. I found the animal cruelty legislation 2017 and I'm going, I plan, I have at least one, maybe two, animal cruelty bills. I'm going to file. And number five, this has been interesting. It's student government, the laws regulating student governments. We have, we've had an issue at Florida state. the Senate body president has made some antisemitic, website and some other derogatory terms towards Jews. And. Many of the Jewish students do not feel comfortable with them remaining as their Senate president. And there hasn't, I a, I actually attended as I'm an incoming chair of the Jewish legislative caucus, and I actually attended their meeting and he refused to allow, need to speak on a, Jewish register. Yeah. It was just, it was easy as he had the discretion to say, I don't want any guest speakers on the viewpoint based discrimination. It really was that he knew why I was good to say about the, I was in support of a resolution defining antisemitism. we're working with the Noles for Israel to form some additional ways of removal of, student body elected officials so that we can ensure that there's. none of that kind of stuff going on and ensure that it's representative of the student body, because it's just, I think that right now, there's just really no way of removing him from that role. Even if it makes many of the Jewish students feel uncomfortable. Yeah, that was, it's very, it's a difficult issue. I've been working actually hand in hand with the president of the nose for Israel, because I have him now going and setting appointments with all my colleagues in both the house and in the Senate to ensure that the legwork is going to be done and that the students get to air how they feel. it's probably, these are virtual meetings that they're setting up, it would be nice if it would be. Yeah, personal, but we're not, we're in the COVID age,

Steve Wallace:

what would you like to ask representative Slosberg?

Celena Muzic:

I'm in shock that. Someone like that wouldn't be removed a little bit easier. So especially given everything going on and in the country. So that to me is shocking, but I'm glad that you're taking the steps necessary because I have not tolerance for any of that. And I feel like. We need to be more progressive. The world has changed so much. So I don't, I really have no idea understanding of people like this. Yeah. I have another question though. I did want to bring up, what are your views on climate change? I keep seeing everything going on in California and I'm like, okay, I'm in the sunshine state, but. Who knows what can happen.

Emily Slosberg:

Yeah. Our environment is incredibly important and yeah, this is. It's horrible. What's going on over in California. we do have to look at our regulations and I'm also, I'm very I'm for the environment. I know my, I haven't, I have an opponent who's also, an environmental activist and I'm, I share, I shared those, his beliefs in protecting our environment, protecting, yeah, in fact, I actually, some. It piece of legislation, which I haven't discussed. It's also about, and I'm planning actually looking at working on is about particularly our drinking water because filed, recently it's the past we've as opposed to we previously had every 12 months, we would have, inspectors from the state, come out and inspect our underground storage tanks for fuel. And it would be every 12 months, at least. One annual inspection. And that has been changed. That was changed to Atlas around 18 months. And it's not day every underground storage tank. So now what I'm looking at doing is coming back and hiring those yearly inspections for, cause that's where our water is our, and It just devastating if we wait too for something to happen and we don't catch it within 18 months or even longer, and we have to be vigilant, we have to be on top of it. And so that's actually another, an environmental issue that ha that was brought to me. it's a priority of Palm beach County, when it comes to. For our environment. And so that's something that I'm going to be working on, next session, but also, we also have the issue of, and I know that the community organization is very against the building lot are on our ag land And so I think that's a County issue, but I am very close with some of our County commissioners and our County mayor. And we'll be advocating against any types of development on those.

Steve Wallace:

we appreciate that because that's right in our backyard. So yeah.

Emily Slosberg:

Yeah, that's a, it's a big issue. It's a big topic. And I don't, I'm not aware of any thing like today happening, but, I will talk to the commission and ensure that, I voice my opposition to any type of development that is planned or.

Steve Wallace:

Excellent.

Celena Muzic:

And then climate change is something that like traffic affects everyone every way. So I have another question, which, I just, I want to know what your views are right now on helping people suffering during this pandemic. Financially, Stephen and I, we, we, our office does foreclosure and bankruptcy and we see a lot of that. and with the moratorium for rent, I find that there's going to be a lot of people who can't pay their mortgage. And I fear that it's just going to go down that rabbit hole of the D a depression and what are your views on and what can be done to help these people not lose their homes.

Emily Slosberg:

It's a great question. And I have had hundreds of constituents reach out regarding their, Unemployment assistance. And also with these concerns of possibly not being able to pay their mortgage or when the moratorium ends actually going into foreclosure. And so what you know, from if it was necessary and I'm not sure, like right now, We're at the stage where bigs are cooperating and allowing, some discretion to put those later payments due at the end of it. And which is what I'm hearing from some of the constituents, cause that we're worried that have looked into it. but if they don't, if there is no, if. There, if they are going to try to foreclose due to this, right after the moratorium ends, or if there aren't scheduling on the payments or in, the legislature is going to have to act, we're going to have to ensure that we've, we don't, that there's not all of these foreclosures and that people don't lose their homes. Don't have to come up with some type of restructuring requirements if necessary, because it's just, we're going to have to do. We're going to have to help out those who have lost their jobs and lost other things due to the scope of situation. I think that's something that we're, that's a really a real concern or try to put together some type of, plan to help, some type of. Grant or some other, something of that to these homeowners who are able to afford their payments. We're, some type of short term, relief it, similar to a business owner or something like that, we're going to have to do something.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. So we hear a lot of how contentious the Florida house is, and it's not very collegial, but who is your Republican bestie in the Florida house or the Florida Senate?

Emily Slosberg:

I'd say representative, Jackie Toledo is a Republican.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. And she, if my memory serves me correctly, she worked with you on the texting while driving bill?

Emily Slosberg:

Yes. Yes.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. So that's nice to see that you are able to find some common ground. Despite, some philosophical differences.

Emily Slosberg:

Yeah. We made a really good team. She worked a lot with the Republican part. I've worked the democratic part and we came together like discuss, everything that we possibly could that could come up in committees were up very late into the night. during this bill, we had filed it to two sessions together. She's a mother of five or six children and very, this was actually very close to her heart as well.

Steve Wallace:

Excellent. So for those of our listeners that don't know, and you touched upon it at the beginning of the episode, your father also was in the legislature. So when you decided to run for office, what advice did your father provide you both as a father, as well as like a political mentor?

Emily Slosberg:

Yeah, some of that, some of the advice that he told me was. Make sure to assemble a good team. Your office is, it is so vital to have a team behind you. And that's exactly what I did. Yeah. I have, ed soul. Who's my legislator. Oh, he's phenomenal at it because it knows everybody in the community. He's a leader in the community for years and very friendly and understands how to talk and deal with people and understands who to call when to call them. and then my legislative assistant is Jack Anderson. He's also he's. He's great. Yeah, phenomenal guy. And so I, I took that advice and, and I put together a great team, another piece of advice, he told me it was to pick my battles. He's you can't win every battle. You don't go to, you just, you have to give a little bit at some point and just know what's really important in the process. And so I think that. Also, it was critical advice, especially getting along with, getting along with the other party with the Republican party, being a Democrat and just working together across party lines. you can't change. Everyone's mind. You guys can't agree. Can't agree on everything on every policy, but we could still work together.

Steve Wallace:

So what is your favorite part of being a legislature Slater. And what is your least favorite part about being a legislator?

Emily Slosberg:

My favorite part about being a legislator is being able to create this public safety policy. That's going to save hundreds of thousands of lives in the state of Florida. I really, that is really something I've dedicated my life to, is trying to save lives. And I, it's just such a satisfying experience to actually have this legislation pass when good legislation passes, negative. I would say just the opposite I have had. I've had, I filed a legislation. A lot of my legislation is from constituents who have lost somebody or have a personal issue that they're trying to address. And just last session I filed legislation or, a woman who had lost her son, and just, yeah, a very tragic way. And I found some legislation on his, on their behalf and. It just didn't move anywhere. I did not make it out of committee. It didn't make it anywhere, just died in this first committee staff. And she was just devastated. And so it's something that's very frustrating because she, and I hadn't really. it's difficult to go back and relay the results and talk about it. it's very good. for her to get back up and, I would file it again, next session for her. If that was something she'd be comfortable doing it, it's up to her, but it was a very upsetting that it had not even moved out of one committee. So that's one of the things, but more frustrating things about being the legislators, not being able to get, to move the policy. Excellent.

Steve Wallace:

Selena and I are going to ask you each one more policy, business related question. Then we're going to have some fun and learn a little bit more about representative. Slosberg what she likes, what she dislikes on a pop culture basis. And then I'll finish us out with, with the lightning round. Okay.

Celena Muzic:

I'm going to go first, but, what are your views on mental health issues? Not just, In general, but in the school systems and for the police department, because I feel like a lot of things that are going on right now may be a result of some sort of trauma, PTSD or just not job. a mental health issue that probably has been there from the very beginning.

Emily Slosberg:

Yeah, absolutely. I think it, I think, there is a major, it's, what we have to do is we re first of all, mental health and the schools are underfunded it yeah. A hundred percent. We need to fund mental health in our schools. And second, we have to tell, we have to also let our children and everybody know that it's okay to say you need mental health help, or you need to take a mental health day. I actually had filed legislation, that we have given. Students I'm the authority and it's school district that their option to have to take mental health days. Because it's so important to start that young, to say, mom or dad, I want to speak today and have a mental health day or certain issues that have been bothering me. Mental health is just as important as your physical health. You it's really something that we need to tell our kids. It's okay to talk about openly. We shouldn't be ashamed of it the longer it could actually create for mental health difficulties like PTSD. And so there are, it's okay to get help. It's something that we, the stigma, I think it's important that we remove that stigma around mental health. another piece of legislation that I filed regarding mental health, is requiring, insurance companies. Although on the federal level, they are required. Insurance companies are required to cover in parody, mental health and physical injury. However, it's not really, if there's no accountability, there's, it's just, they make these obstacles to covering mental health is theirs, these three, approvals that need to be given and all these other obstacles that they. They put in the way it's actually covering mental health issue. So one of the issues that I, or one of the lead pieces of legislation I filed last session would have given it would have made some type of accountability when to the insurance companies, so that we're able to track what they're covering and how they're covering it, how they're denying coverage. For mental health issues, which I plan again, to work on. It's really a big issue And I think with this COVID Christ, we have a naturally, we have a breakfast with law enforcement and, fire with our mental health having, we have to, I think we have to also, Fun policies and be more policy friendly for mental health and for those groups and given their COVID situation, we're gonna, we're gonna see this, coming up, in the legislature, I actually requested that we have a committee fully focused mental health issues because we have health and human services, but we don't have anything that really focuses on just mental health and the state of New York. They actually have them natural health committee, a full committee.

Steve Wallace:

My last policy related question is why should the constituents of your district vote for you and why?

Emily Slosberg:

Yeah, I've was elected in 2016. I love my job. I love serving the constituents of my district. My office is. On the corner of Hagen ranch and Atlantic in Del Ray. It's right in the heart of district 91. I'm, we're always there for you. my phone number too, will, can be found probably on the Carver website. I love what I do. I love serving. I love being your voice in Tallahassee. it's an honor a pleasure and a privilege to serve house district 91. And I really look forward to anyone that, and I really appreciate all the support. I know you have my vote, so you don't have to worry about that, but we're working hard to make sure we send you back to Tallahassee.

Steve Wallace:

So just shifting gears a little bit, we're going to go into a little pop culture bander. So my first question for you, representative Slosberg is what is your favorite song and why, and what event does it capture in your life?

Emily Slosberg:

Oh, that's a great question. My favorite song. Oh my, I love country music. yeah. Let me think about that. I would say, this is that's such a hard question to that you pose right there.

Steve Wallace:

I'll give you a two or three, if you can't just narrow it down to one.

Emily Slosberg:

Okay. I can give you a few of your, I like Vince Gill. I like it reminds me of I liked the song. When I call your name, it reminds me of the old days growing up, like my family, we would always listen to, we, we've had such great memories with Ben skill. we just, I say, but yeah, good skills for sure.

Steve Wallace:

I would have not have guessed that we learned something new.

Celena Muzic:

Okay. I have a question. What was your favorite hunt? Eighties movie, or what is your favorite eighties movie of all time and eighties, celebrity.

Emily Slosberg:

I, I can, I do nineties.

Celena Muzic:

You can do 90 minutes.

Steve Wallace:

You have to tell us you're 90 celebrity crush though.

Emily Slosberg:

Okay. Yeah. So my favorite movie is legends of the fall with that. With Anthony Hopkins, legends of the fall. Have you ever seen any Hopkins? He's a phenomenal actor. I also did my, which is great because my crushes in there, Brad Pitt has always been my crush nineties and, and forward. So yeah, he ages, and this is a tear jerker. I love that. I just won. Everything if I just, yeah. And my favorite actor is probably is Anthony Hopkins, Brad Pitt. So it has two of my favorites.

Steve Wallace:

what show or shows have you been binge-watching okay. Def Netflix.

Emily Slosberg:

It's called blood money and it's, it's not even an English. it's a Turkish. It's in Turkish. They're speaking Turkish, but it's English subtitled. And that has. It has one season that is stands like over a hundred episodes. I still haven't finished it. Wow. It's like a, it's almost like a soap, a Turkish soap opera. It's phenomenal. It's great. Let me check that out.

Steve Wallace:

I've watched Cobra, Kai, so I have nothing left to watch now on Netflix. So I'm going to check it out. Yeah.

Celena Muzic:

Okay. that's a good one. That's a good one. Okay. I want to know if you were. Okay, last question. If you could eat anything, if you were stuck on an Island, what would it be?

Emily Slosberg:

Oh, that's what a good question. I asked the good questions on attorneys are human, too. Pipe pizza, cheese pizza, nothing on it.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. Excellent. So now we're going to go to the lightening round, this or that questions. So my first question is that pizza question. New York pizza, Chicago. Okay. Okay. dogs or cats? Dogs. And you have a dog. What's your dog's name? Cause I see on Facebook, you're always with your dog. The Rido she's what kind of dog is it now? They're in a pug mix. It's just not it's acuity. It's acute. Okay. Beaches or mountains, beaches, hugs, or kisses. Okay. And last but not least drum roll, please. Michael Jordan or LeBron James. Michael Jordan. Okay. Excellent. Thank you so much representative Slosberg. And for those of you that don't know, please vote early often for representative Slosberg on the November ballot. How can we find you online?

Emily Slosberg:

And. Yep. You can go on Facebook and just type in Emily Slosberg I'm on Twitter as well. Just type in Emily Slosberg I have a Twitter and Facebook and you can do that's where you will find navigate. I have a, and those are all connected to the website. So you can find my website on, through Facebook. Fabulous. Thank you so much. And again, please vote for representative Salzburg. She's working hard for all of us to keep everybody safe.