Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast

Episode 23-Law and Order Featuring Sheriff Ric Bradshaw

October 15, 2020 Sheriff Ric Bradshaw Season 2 Episode 3
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 23-Law and Order Featuring Sheriff Ric Bradshaw
Chapters
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 23-Law and Order Featuring Sheriff Ric Bradshaw
Oct 15, 2020 Season 2 Episode 3
Sheriff Ric Bradshaw

We have the pleasure of having Palm Beach County Sheriff Ric Bradshaw as our guest in this Episode.

Topics discussed include:
Why Sheriff Bradshaw chose a law enforcement career
Description of PBSO Mental Health Unit
Proper Policing Training and Techniques
De-escalation Training
Community Policing
Analysis of George Floyd Tragedy
Why Should You Vote for Sheriff Bradshaw
Pop Culture Banter
Lightning Round

Show Notes Transcript

We have the pleasure of having Palm Beach County Sheriff Ric Bradshaw as our guest in this Episode.

Topics discussed include:
Why Sheriff Bradshaw chose a law enforcement career
Description of PBSO Mental Health Unit
Proper Policing Training and Techniques
De-escalation Training
Community Policing
Analysis of George Floyd Tragedy
Why Should You Vote for Sheriff Bradshaw
Pop Culture Banter
Lightning Round

Steve Wallace:

we have a true pleasure today. We have sheriff Rick Bradshaw, who is the sheriff of Palm beach County. Hi sheriff.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

Aye. How are you?

Steve Wallace:

Could you just tell us what made you decide to go into law enforcement?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

first of all, I love that lawyers are humans to me. Let's get them, let's get the word out. Law enforcement officers are humans, too.

Steve Wallace:

exactly.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

Families. We all got bills to pay and we're just like you, we got a different job. You know what I was a high school and a college basketball player. And I got, it was the height of the Vietnamese war. Yeah. The draft was still in effect. I was going to get drafted. So I decided to join the Marine Corps. And I came out the Marines in 1971 and I was so like ingrained into the uniform and the regimentation and the, the paramilitary thing. It was a natural fit for me for law enforcement, because it's quite a pair of military. It was more paramilitary back in seventies. I really didn't know which way to go in life. So I thought, I'll give that a try. And 50 years later, I'm still giving it a try.

Steve Wallace:

Excellent. you're doing a great job and I did pick up that you were a former high school and college basketball player. And I played in high school and I coach AAU ball now. So we're gonna, we're going to save a couple of basketball questions to the end. Okay.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

I realized that I was not going to be in the NBA when I went from being a power forward at six three. At 63 of these guys were monsters and I go, I'm not gonna make it. but anyhow, the best thing that ever happened to me was going in the Marine Corps. it made something out of me. it made me realize that there's some, you need to dedicate some of your life to service and it kinda stuck with me and, that's all I've done. My entire adult life is service to the community. I'm happy that it turned out like that. I guess we all have our path is designed for us and that was mine.

Steve Wallace:

So my father was not in the Marine Corps. My father was in the army and my father is similar to you. He loved the regimentation of the military. So what's your favorite memory in being in the Marines?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

jeez. It wasn't my favorite at the time, which was Paris Island. there was some real stories about that. Some of them, I can tell some of them, I can't, the days that we were there, where you actually had to put together and take apart firearms, blindfolded. So in case you were night and there was no light, you still were able to do what you were able to do. So that was fascinating. And, something I'll always remember how to do.

Steve Wallace:

I've seen a lot of movies of the Marine Corps, like full metal jacket and things like that. And which was your drill Sergeant, similar to those characters in some of the movies we've seen?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

it was unexperienced. they get you up every morning, like at four o'clock in the morning and it's not a pleasant experience the way they wake you up. but it's all designed for you to be able to survive in combat. especially back then, cause they were training us to go to Vietnam. so at four o'clock in the morning, they got you up out of a dead sound sleep and you had to start functioning and get out there. And then we run three miles and it was a long day and they wanted to get you exhausted. So you knew what it was to be sleep deprived and still be able to do what you needed to do in combat. like I said, it was a good learning experience for me and probably shaped a lot of my thoughts today. the leadership there and I still do it today. the leadership there never ate before they're men. If it was time to eat, all the men came. First leadership came second and I still do today before coven hit. If we had a banquet or something, I've made sure that all the people, it worked for me. He first and I lasted because I learned that your employees are the most valuable thing you have.

Celena Muzic:

That is fantastic. Let me ask you, what advice would you give someone young, trying to join the military since you have such

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

experience? Yeah, do it. it's I think it forms a lot of good traits that people need leadership, how to be a team player, how to, survive, how to take care of yourself. show up with. Your shirt, pressed your pants pressed be on time. No, there's an old saying if you're not early, you're late. I could tell the difference in people that we hire. Other people that have been in the military and the people that don't have any structure in their life. They came from living with mom and dad into another environment, and they're late to show up and their clothes are disheveled. And. And they're not used to taking direction and orders. And they're a little bit rebellious about that and I don't care what job you're in. There's always going to be a boss and you're always going to have to follow instructions. So the more you get used to that, and the more that you can make yourself presentable and realize that you have to be on time and you have to take orders. I think the better off you are in life. So I, I'm a big proponent of people going into the military. It doesn't have to be a career. But a couple of years of that will make you a much better person, I think.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. So just to follow up on that you gave advice on young folks that are looking to go in the military. what advice would you give a young person, either male or female. That's looking to go into the law enforcement

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

career? it's a tough environment now. I just had this conversation the other day. we're waiting to see how many applicants we're going to get. look at 50 years of doing this job. I've seen this it's, it's a roller coaster. I go back into times where we had, incidents like this and there was riots in the streets and it wasn't a good time. And then, but people realized that the police are there to help you then times get good and then times get bad again. And then you have nine 11 where people depend on us. And then you have stupid bonehead things that happen where you have these incidences that are out there, where police are depicted in the worst possible way. And then things get bad again. And then it'll come back around where people realize that they need us to keep them safe and they keep their neighborhoods safe and their quality of life. So I'll be interested to see how much this affects our applicant pool. I still think it's a good job if you join for the right reasons, which means to serve your community and make people's lives better. Cause that's the real reason. and it, we're going to see, but I think that all in all, if we come out of this and we learn how to talk to each other, we learn how to sit down and solve problems. We understand that not all cops are bad. Look, there's 800,000 cops in this nation. bit of people that have stupid things and they are stupid. It's bad training. it's going to come back around. People are going to realize we're out there to help them and make your life better. And I'm going to tell you something, I just read some surveys, the African American community. They want more police, but they want good police. Okay. There is the operative word. Good. Honest. Well-trained. They don't want less. They want more because they realize that their neighborhoods are going to be safe. If there's more of us there, look what's happening in New York, Chicago, Baltimore, all of these places, the homicide rates up the shootings are up. The narcotic sales are up. You don't lie. Police are leaving. They're not getting out of their cars. They're not doing anything because of the leadership of those cities. And it's turned their back on them. It's not good. And they're learning a hard lesson about it. again, it all goes back to, we got to learn how to talk with each other, got to learn how to get along. We needed the police, got to realize we've made some mistakes. We need to get better. Hopefully the community will say, let's give you a chance, but here's what we expect that we know you're not all bad. and move forward. It can be done, but it just look at this is like being married. You got to learn how to get along, Not right all the time. there's a medium here. Yeah. And you got to learn how to find a middle ground and get along and move forward. Okay.

Steve Wallace:

So you've been in law enforcement for 50 years. And you started in, you were just a career employee

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

at what,

Steve Wallace:

make the transition from being a career employee to leadership and, or, and then ultimately, this current position is an elected office.

Celena Muzic:

And was that your goal?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

no, it was, I got into the job because I wanted to serve my community and make it better. I started in West Palm, and boy, 50 years ago it was entirely different than it was now, entirely different. And, I just started doing my job, and I did it the best I could. And I started getting promoted because they realized that I was in this job for a career for the right reasons, certainly one for the money. Cause I was making $3 and 19 cents an hour when I started. Yeah. as I went along in each position, then I moved into, because I gave it a hundred percent and I loved the job and I dedicated myself to it. The leadership at that time, they took notice to that. And, I started getting promoted. It wasn't my goal. Like the, I just was happy to be a detective Sergeant and, solving cases. But as I moved up in the organization, they kept promoting me up and up because they realized that I had those leadership abilities that I learned to get in the Marines and was able to get people to do things because they wanted to do it. Not because they had to do it. And a good leader always gets people to do things because they want to do it for the right reasons. Not because they have to do it. I can order people to do things, but it doesn't get done the best unless they want to do it. I worked my way up to be the chief of police, the first person in the history of West Palm beach. so I worked there for 33 years. I was a police chief for eight years. And when I was getting ready to retire, the state attorney at the time. And a judge came to me and said, look, we need you to run for sheriff because the agency is just in total disrepair. It's just not problems. They've had three sheriffs at eight years is going to doing nothing but downhill. And we think that you can do this, and I've never been in elected office before. So I said, how went home and talked to my wife? She said, okay, we'll give it a try. That was. Two years before the election was probably the worst two years I've ever spent in my life. But the first election in 2004 was nasty. It was horrible. It was just, I'd never been used to that type of treatment. And what do you remember that? And

Steve Wallace:

you can't, it was

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

bad. anyhow, I was fortunate enough to get elected and my training as a police chief taught me how to run organizations and be a leader. So we did some things immediately. and over the last 16 years, we've been able to take a Sheriff's office that was an actual train wreck and turn it into one of the most highly respected law enforcement agencies, not only in this state, but the country. I point to the fact that when it came time for the United States Senate to have hearings on how law enforcement agencies need to address mental health issues and active shooters, I was the only person in law enforcement asked to go testify in front of the Senate on how we do things and how we treat mental health and how our mental health unit deescalates things, how we're able to identify things ahead of time to stop school shootings, to stop mass shootings. it was a real honor and, the people in that hearing room, Lindsey Graham was the chairman and all the people that you see there today that are doing the cemeteries were there. And all of them to a person said to you, that's an amazing thing that you started there. And now, after what happened with the Floyd incident, you see all these agencies around the country are trying to start their own mental health units. And they're replicating what we started six years ago. And we get calls all the time from people saying, how'd you do that? What do you do? How do you put it together? Because they really, I realize the value of it and what we've done. And it's been a tremendous value to us. I'm very proud of where the Sheriff's office is today. one of the reasons that I'm running for reelection again, is I want to expand that unit. I've got seventeens now, when I say a team, it's a deputy that has a PhD or a master's degree in social science or mental health. And then I hear a mental health professional from the community to be that person's partner. They're actually all worked for the sheriff. And I have seven of those that I want to go to 14 teams because of the value that it is. I'm the biggest mental health provider out here in the County jail. And that's wrong. That's just fundamentally wrong. there's people in there that have done some stupid things, but it's because they had mental health issues and they shouldn't be in there. They should be in mental health facilities. And that's one of the goals of this unit is to keep those people out of there. They don't belong there. And then deescalate situations involved with people that have mental health issues that before this unit was in effect, we had to use deadly force and you don't want to do that. This unit has deescalated situations since then it turned out much different.

Celena Muzic:

I'm glad you're doing that. You mentioned that. is there a way, and I don't know if this is possible, it'd be great. If you could even train other departments around the country to just have something like this. It seems like there's just so much lack of training and even education that I just think it would alleviate all of this attention.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

let me tell you, I'm glad that let's transition a little bit over to training. If you go back and look at all these things, start with the George board and go on into some of the other things that have happened. I've worked at each one of them. It's bad training. There's no good reason for them to happen, but to have your knee on somebody's neck like that, nobody trains for that. There's not one agency in Palm beach County. That trains for that. if you're going to put your knee someplace, you put it in the middle of somebody's back. If you have to control them for a minute, because that's a controlling area in your back. You're not controlling anything with somebody's D on your neck. It doesn't even make remote sense. if you've got to control some blanket, the handcuffs a lot and put them in the back of a car at the very least, if they're complaining about something, cause we have a policy. If we're arresting somebody and they either aren't injured or they're complaining of an injury, we call the fire medics right there to us on the scene. Cause we don't want something bad to go wrong in there. yes, you're in somebody, but you're not there to, watch him suffer. So we bring the fireman. It's all a matter of training. It's like the incident you saw with the guy that was walking around the car with a knife that you got this officer, what has gone out that's stupidity. you don't let that happen. So training is good. It's easy to say that, but then improve it and I'll tell you how you prove. We train a lot of deescalation. In other words, with deputy gets on scene or something. If he can bring that situation down, there's a thing called tactical pause, which we started and it's used all over the nation now. And what that means is you slow things down, right? Cause usually you can go back and situations that have handled really badly, they happen really fast in about a minute and a half or two. And all of these other situations you're looking at things happen really fast. It had bad things happen. So the more you slow it down, the more you get things under control, the better off you are because you get resources there. We had a, this is about four weeks ago. Now we had a call at Walmart at Belvedere four 41. Nicole was a shoplifter. So the deputy goes over. They figure it's a regular shoplifter. He's going to get the guys he's walking out the door. You know how you look at your slip? The store security goes, that's the guy that has shoplifted. The guy takes out a really big knife and just takes a fighting stance and challenges the deputies. And I'm not going anywhere. So the deputy did the right thing. His training teaches him, slow it down. He talks to the guys say, look, let's not make this worse back up, take it easy. Nobody needs to get hurt here. In the meantime, we're getting more resources there. So he's taken the tactical pause. So we get resources there. So he starts talking to the guy, takes out his taser, not as gun and says, look, I don't want to have to use this. This is not going to be bad. It's just a shoplifting. Let's not make it worse. So what do you have the bottom line? Is this. We got the resources there. They ended up having to tase him. They take him into custody. He's not hurt. We get the knife. That's how you do it. That's great. All right. Now, I'm not saying that he couldn't have gone really bad if the guy, all of a sudden charged us, but because of the training that we do because of the deescalation matters because of the non lethal use of force, it worked out good. So when I say we train and train, and it's not just a matter of me saying that there's the proof of the pudding right there, let her present. And I can tell you about five or six other cases, including people in firearms that we've deescalated. But it's easy to say you're trained, but unless you can prove it by things you actually do, then it's just words, right? But that's book training is essential. Whatever you do in real life is what you did and training. That's how it clicks in him. Because a lot of times you don't have time to think you fall back on what your training is. So that's why when you see these stupid things that are being done, it's because it's bad training or lack of training. It doesn't make any sense. Okay.

Steve Wallace:

A little bit. So one of the other things that I know your agency is well-regarded for is Homeland security, and I know you have a lot of Homeland security experience. Could you elaborate a little bit on that, sheriff?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

Yeah. and that's another thing that I try to explain to people that's important about this election is, being the chairman of Homeland security and being the lead agency for all of South Florida means you go from Martin County to key West. There's 132 agencies that we actually direct under our umbrella. Wow. That's a big responsibility in order to get this chair, but you, first of all, you have to have a top secret government clearance, which is not easy to get the FBI literally goes back to the day. You put your little tiny foot on a piece of paper as a new board until today, everything that's ever transpired in your life. Otherwise you're not going to get. The ability to know government secrets and have that type of clearance. So one, it's hard to get that plus the experiences that you have to have and the ability to understand that a lot of my education, I only got a masters in business administration. a minor part of it was in emergency management. So 10 years ago, the governor appointed me to take this position. It was supposed to be a two year position and every year after that, because we've done such a good job, they keep asking us to do it. Now, what comes along with that is cause some people will say, geez, your need to be responsible for Palm beach County. And I am. But what comes along with that is the technology and the ability to have resources and our intelligence gathering our fusion center, which is the intelligence gathering. A part of the Homeland security gathers intelligence for all of South Florida. That means we know everything that's happening across the world, that any threat to South Florida, not to mention, we keep up with, white supremacists groups. we, people that want to come in and cause problems during demonstrations, there's just a lot of information that flows across that. So it's a very important position. If you elect somebody to this job that doesn't have the ability to do that, this job is going away. They'll take it to Miami. It was in Miami for a lot of years, so we'll lose it. And that's a big loss for this County because look, our border is the ocean. We don't have a fit. You can't put up a fence. It's not like Mexican, right? So people are trying to get in here all the time. We stopped boats with people trying to sneak in here regularly. And these are not nice people. These are not people that are trying to free oppression by. I didn't get a better life bringing their family here. These are bad people. I'm talking gang members that want to get in here because it's easier for them to operate. They could melt into society. they got a lot of chances to. Get any other gangs that are here and they're just genuinely bad people not to mention the fact, the last set of boats that we stopped. Everybody on I'm tested positive for COVID not only are they bad people, they're sick. Oh boy. So we don't want them getting in here. so it's a big responsibility for Homeland security here, to keep this county's teeth. Keep people out of our County and our neighborhoods that we don't want here and make sure that we're going to be safe in our own homes, but it's an even bigger job now that we know that the people are coming here, they're coming from countries that are out of control with the sickness. And now they're going to bring some more sickness in here. So it's a big job. we're very good at it. And people know it. That's why every two years when it comes around, they keep asking us to do it. and we're very proud of where we at what we do.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. we're aware that you're on the ballot, in November. Could you tell our listeners why sheriff Rick Bradshaw should be reelected?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

if they were listening to what I just said, there's a lot of good reasons in there. here's the thing. And I don't talk bad about whoever's running against me. I haven't done that in four elections and I'm not going to do it now. But I will say this, the person and the persons that have run against me, they're just not qualified. Period. 25 years of my 50 years, I have been the leader of two of the largest. Law enforcement agencies in this County, one is West Palm and now the Sheriff's office, right? So this is what I do. This is what I have been doing. I have a track record that I am executive, right? These other people have been lower level managers. I'm the guy that's running against me now. He was gone for 10 years and then came back here and now thinks he knows everything about what's going on here. But they're all lower level managers that have never run an organization. Look, this is a $758 million business, and it's not just law enforcement. You're running. Dale's you run the courthouse, you run the airport, you run, the waterways, you name it, right? So there's a lot of aspects here. corrections is a whole new world in itself. So if you don't have some understanding, if you've never been a leader of an organization, How are you going to step into these shoes one day and just say, I think I could do it. This is not a job you learn while you're doing it. The best training I had was being a police executive as a police chief, because it was the largest municipal police department. So I have the education, I have the experience, I have the knowledge and it's just not a time if you, but the editorial boards that have endorsed me, which is the host and the central, sunset. No, they've said the same thing. reelect Bradshaw, because he's the one that has the experience. He's the one that knows the job. He's not saying to somebody, I think I could do this. If you gave me a chance, I think I can do it. I'm telling you I've done it. we've reduced crime 25% in the last four years. a lot of good things on the horizon. I wanted to mention body cameras because we're in the process of getting those. We've been wanting them for years, but it's very expensive. So now I'm going to get up and weave it. We think it's the last piece of technology that's going to be really good for us. so we're in the process of doing that. We've already instituted all the police reforms that they're talking about across the country. The eight can't wait things, like banning choke holds and not shooting at cars and having, investigate use of force and good training. We've already done all of those. We've been doing it for the last five years. So we're right where we need to be and always expanding. our community policing is a model for the County. what we've done in our cities. We've taken over 12 cities since I've been the sheriff and you can talk to the elected officials. They're the mayors, they're all supporting me because we've turned their cities around or reduced their crime rate, and giving them a better way of life. like I said, I think if people really vote for somebody that has. Demonstrate it to them that they're a leader that they're running a great agency that moving forward, it's going to be even better and not vote in a partisan manner. What I know partisanship is out there and I guess if you're electing like a city commissioner or a Senator or something, I get it. But law enforcement is not partisan for 16 years. It's been a nonpartisan agency. And just because the courts changed it hasn't changed me. Like my decision making is what's better. It's for you and your family to make you safe. That's how I make decisions. Not on, based on ours or DS or independents or whatever's the best for you and your family to make it the best way of life. That's how I make decisions and I will make those decisions the same way going forward. So I will hope people when they vote and they looked down the ballot, when they get to that position, forget about whether this is Republican or Democrat. Vote for the person that is the one that you trust to make the best decisions for your family. That's how you choose that position and nothing else. if I don't leave anybody with anything else today, if that's the way you need to make your decision here.

Steve Wallace:

Okay, great. We're going to shift gears a little bit and just get to know your Bradshaw a little bit more as a person, a little personally. So my first question is

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

what is your favorite

Steve Wallace:

song or songs of all time and why?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

I'm like a lot of people. I like music it to me. It's Relaxing. I watch very little TV, in the car. I have a playlist that I put on and it goes really across the whole spectrum. I got 60, 70 eighties. I got some music that I like today. Couple of country Western songs, but it just all is, is it soothing? Is it relaxing? Does it give me like a little incentive? all the spectrums and I can't really pick out one song, but it's just the music in general, I think is good for everybody. It's

Celena Muzic:

a mix. Okay. I'm gonna, switch that question up a little bit. What was the first concert you ever attended?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

Woo. This is going to be way back before either one of you guys were bored. It was actually the rolling stones. Oh, okay. Yeah. Yeah. Way back in the early part of the West Palm beach history, they had, the national guard armies were great big buildings and they used to have concerts. And really a nationally known world renowned bands would come into the Palm beach County area and do one night concerts. And our rolling stones came to the national guard army up in West Palm beach, and I was able to get in there. That's fine.

Celena Muzic:

Wow. That's amazing.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

Yeah, it is. It is.

Steve Wallace:

so our friend, Leslie Schreiber wanted me to ask you this question.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

Lastly, I've got a great girl and she's a really good woman. Yeah.

Steve Wallace:

And she made this possible and we appreciate that. What is your favorite flavor of ice cream?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

Oh, wow. It's going to be easy questions. I may be like a lot of people. I like it and it's a mixture of peanut butter and chocolate and vanilla ice cream, and it's all mixed together and it's called moose tracks. Oh yeah, that's good. Oh, okay. I could get pretty brilliant in the bootstraps, but it's got the peanut butter and the chocolate Gliadel and all that. So yeah, that's pretty much into that. That is yummy.

Celena Muzic:

That does sound delicious.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

Okay.

Celena Muzic:

I'm going to get a little wild with this one, but who would you say was your celebrity crush when you were younger?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

that's gotta be very faucet. Oh, that's nice. Yeah. She's very good. I'm telling you. I was really jealous when that $6 million man became a $7 million man when he got out.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. so no, not now knowing that you wish somebody, I never knew that you were, you're a former basketball player, the big debate in our show, after watching during the pandemic, that was the documentary about the bull's dynasty, who is the greatest of all time, Michael Jordan or LeBron James.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

That one's tough. I think that when you get down to, I'm a Michael Jordan Guy. I was a Boston Celtics guy with Larry Bird and Bob Cousy. those guys, Michael Jordan is to me still,

Celena Muzic:

he

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

could fly through the air. if you saw some of the things that he did, he was, he would leave the ground, his hang time. but they each in their own era have been as good as they could be. the bulls, I'm not so sure they, they got a dynasty, but the Lakers are woo. They're tough. They really are. But, yeah, I like Michael Jordan.

Steve Wallace:

The lead in are going to ask you one more question each and then we're going to finish with the lightning round, which is just very simple, this or that questions. Then we'll get you back to business and we appreciate all your time.

Celena Muzic:

Perfect. Okay, I'll go first because I feel like you can really answer this with your military background. If you were stuck on an Island, what would you bring with you? That would be essential. If you can only bring one item

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

though life. Hey, in the military, in the Marines, they give you a thing called a K bar. And so it's a pretty big knife, but it's serrated down in here and it's sharp on the edge. And the reason I say a knife is number one, you finish with it. You can cut with it. You could start a fire with it. You can cut down trees to make a shelter with it. You can protect yourself with it. You can find water with it. Without a knife. you're you're out of luck.

Steve Wallace:

That's very good. Okay. So my last question is, and then is going to finish this up with a lightning round. If you could have dinner with three people in history

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

who would it be? George Patton Eisenhower and Abraham Lincoln.

Steve Wallace:

and how, what would be the topics of conversation at that dinner?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

you can, I'd like to figure out how he was able to mediate things with as bad as things were, because could use that today. People have learned how to mediate things and get people to come together. At the end with Patton, he was a leader. People would follow him anywhere. Anytime this troops were just a hundred percent behind him because he was a leader. And when Eisenhower, he was able to transition from a military life into civilian life. And not only was a great general, he was a good president. So each of those have some qualities that's important for leadership, because if you can't get your people to follow you because they want to, if you can't figure out how to mediate and you can't transition yourself from being a military into a civilian life and learn how to work in both. segments then you're not going to be on the top of the leadership role. So each one of those people I'd love to sit down and talk to them and say, how do you do this? Excellent.

Steve Wallace:

Take us home with the lightening, round it

Celena Muzic:

around. So these are just a few questions, this or that, just to get to know you a little bit better. So first question is beach or mountain.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

A beach.

Celena Muzic:

Hugs or kisses?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

Both

Celena Muzic:

that's. Okay. Tacos

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

or burgers? Oh, tacos,

Celena Muzic:

New York pizza or Chicago pizza?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

I like New York pizza. Yeah. Yeah.

Celena Muzic:

Last question is shorts or pants

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

when I'm not working in shorts.

Celena Muzic:

Okay. So

Steve Wallace:

how do all our listeners find you and how do they get, how do they learn about your campaign and your platforms?

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

They can go onto our website. it's Rick Bradshaw for sheriff of theirs. There's a lot of stuff on there that they can learn about. If they want to help out, they can help out, but they want to learn about, where I'm headed, what I'm doing, what my priorities are. We talked about them today, but there'll be on there again. and just learn a little bit about what's going on. The main thing is people. they just got to get out and vote. 20% of the people can't dictate what we do. people after the election, they complain and they bitch and everything. If you don't vote, you got no right to complain. I agree. I don't want, I don't want to hear you if you didn't get out there and vote. And let's make it happen. And let's make, let's vote for the right person for the right reasons in the right way. That's all. You gotta do three RS, right person, right way. Reasons can't go wrong there.

Steve Wallace:

I already voted and you got plus one for

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

Brett. Thanks. Thank you very much. So this is going to be interesting. a lot of boat by mail and I think it's going to be fine here in Palm beach County. I have great faith in the supervisor of election here. She's a great lady. you're going to see a lot of people out there, early voting. And, if the weather is good and everything, I still think you're going to see a lot of people on election day. I think you're going to see a lot of people. I really do.

Celena Muzic:

I think so. I saw the turnout in Atlanta and it was massive. I heard it was an eight hour. Wait, I saw on the news.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

Yeah.

Steve Wallace:

This was very informative, sheriff Bradshaw, and we'd love to have you on again, once you're reelected.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

let's make it. Let's make it for sure, but not real close after that. If I'm fortunate enough to get lamb elected, I'm going to the beach. That's.

Celena Muzic:

All right.

Steve Wallace:

Thank you so much for your service.

Sheriff Ric Bradshaw:

I had a great time today. We'll do it again. Thank you, sheriff.