Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast

Episode 24-The Living Changing Planet Featuring Dr. Andre Fladell

October 16, 2020 Dr. Andre Fladell Season 2 Episode 4
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 24-The Living Changing Planet Featuring Dr. Andre Fladell
Chapters
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 24-The Living Changing Planet Featuring Dr. Andre Fladell
Oct 16, 2020 Season 2 Episode 4
Dr. Andre Fladell

Join Host Steve Wallace and Co-Host Celena Muzic as they are joined by political and environmental expert Dr. Andre Fladell.

Topics includeL
Ocean rising
Thoughts on an Inconvenient Truth
How as Florida formed and what is it made out of?
Who were the first inhabitants of Florida
Constant change of climate
Future of Coastal Areas
Pop Culture Banter
Lightning Round

Show Notes Transcript

Join Host Steve Wallace and Co-Host Celena Muzic as they are joined by political and environmental expert Dr. Andre Fladell.

Topics includeL
Ocean rising
Thoughts on an Inconvenient Truth
How as Florida formed and what is it made out of?
Who were the first inhabitants of Florida
Constant change of climate
Future of Coastal Areas
Pop Culture Banter
Lightning Round

Steve Wallace:

Welcome everybody to this episode of attorneys are human too. We have a true pleasure today. We have our political and climate change expert, dr. Andre Philadel, the Prince of Palm beach County. And once again, it's truly a pleasure to have you on today, Prince.

Andre Fladell:

Thank you so much.

Steve Wallace:

And so we are going to do this episode in two parts. So you're going to be listening to part one. And then ultimately you're going to download part two my first question to you, Prince is what is your view on ocean rising?

Andre Fladell:

oceans are rising. But I'm going to focus for the minute on the Atlantic ocean, which is most germane to us. And then with Atlantic ocean is considered to be rising war than all the other oceans. It's estimated at the current time that the Atlantic ocean is rising at about four inches every 10 years. Some say 4.3, some say more, but let's take things on a conservative level for this entire program. one of the reasons why the ocean is rising has to do with the Greenland ice shelf. When you have a glass of water and you have ice in it, and the ice melts when it doesn't overflow. So when the ice melts in the Arctic, it's melting over the ocean, it doesn't really contribute to the ocean rise as much as people would like to say it to us. But when the ice melts off of a land shelf, then the ice pores and it pulls straight into the Atlantic ocean from Greenland. From 1900 to the year 2000 Greenland lost eight miles of its ice shelf. That's over a hundred years from 2001 to 2019 in 18 years, it lost nine miles. So in the last 18 years, it's lost more of its ice shelf than it did in the a hundred proceeding that fresh water drips into the Atlantic ocean. Second component is called glacial rebound. If you to lay on a mattress or put a suitcase on a mattress and leave it there for six years, when you take the mattress off the suitcase, there's a dent in the mattress. It doesn't just come right back. But if you watch the mattress over maybe a month, it'll start to come back. Like when you put something on arriving, you've left it there like a couch. There'll be a little dent in the rut or glacial rebound is when the bottom of the ocean and the bottom of where the glaciers were start to rise and they don't rise in a day, their eyes of a thousands of years. So a second contributor is something they called full bulge or isotonic adjustment, which is glacial rebound. Third in the middle of the Atlantic ocean, you have something called the Atlantic Ridge. This can be seen from outer space. The Atlantic Ridge is actually a mountain range, which is forming or a Ridge forming in the bottom of the Atlantic ocean from the Scandinavian North Atlantic to the South Atlantic. This creates also a pressure for the ocean to rise. One thing you have is called land sinking. And these coast is actually sinking part of the East coast. The sand part of these coast is over water. Part of the East coast is a porous limestone and the land on the East coast of the United States or North America particularly is sinking best than most other places. The fifth contributing factor to ocean rise is what a heat expansion. If you take one, a new heat, it expands that you eat anything chemically, physically it expands. So there's actually an expansion of ocean rise based on the difference in the water temperature, which is minimal. And even though the water temperature may be only two degrees in 50 years, that two degrees creates an expansive nature. Remember the ocean expands that one inch. Of course of what are the course of heat. That's waterized next? You have the antibiotic I shelf, which like the Greenland ice shelf is interesting and you gotta remember antibiotic or was originally a forest. And then they had Donica was a desert and only 34 million years ago. Did the antibiotic actually create an ice shelf, which now is starting to melt and melting nicely. And that's also contributing. The last factor I'd like to mention contributing before we talk about human involvement is the Sahara desert. Now a lot of people say, why is this a Harrow sand in the bottom of the ocean? because her desert was a Lake, there was no desert North Africa, 15,000 years ago, the Lake in North Africa was called mega Chad. And mega Chad was 142,000 square miles. And mega Chad was one of the largest freshwater lakes in the world or the planet. And there was dozens and dozens of civilizations that are now found in the Sahara desert that lived off this way. So when you see Sahara and sand flying across the ocean and landing in South America, and I'll tell you about that, the desert is converting back to the Lake system. It was 15,000 years ago. In fact there is considered to be 22 million tons, 22 million tons of Saharan sand in South America. And that said to a fertilized, the Amazon rain forest, because the phosphorus from the bottom of the Lake, which Mars, that desert is now all over South America. And it's the fertilizer, which makes it so fertile. It comes actually from Africa. So Lake rise, ocean rise is not just simply men and it's is hydrocarbons it's, which is a component people who talk about it. Environmentalist, people who talk about climate change need to talk about the Atlantic Ridge and glacial rebound, and they need to talk about the, what a heat expansion and land sinking and the Saharan sand. But too often, they don't. So when I

Steve Wallace:

think of climate change, one of the first things that comes to mind is the L Gore documentary, an inconvenient truth.

Andre Fladell:

What do you

Steve Wallace:

think about that documentary and

Andre Fladell:

it's inconveniently a partial truth and inconveniently a political truth, and it may not be conveniently the total picture and it was not done for the purpose of the total picture. For example. The planet's 4.5 billion years old. And the question I would ask is how long has man been here? And the answer is 200,000 years of 4.5 billion. If the billion B like Donald Trump's money, is that kind of Oh, gotcha. Yeah. If. Men was here and the earth was 24 hours old. Man's been on this planet for three seconds, but more interesting. His pollution where the industrial revolution, which is essentially 100 years, 1920, 1910, the length of the industrial revolution is a hundred years. That's how long we can argue. We've been polluting at some extreme rate. That means that the earth would 24 hours old. We've been polluting the two hundredths of one second. So for 20, if you watch a clock and you stick in a day, you wait till 1159 midnight. You wait for 59 seconds ends in the last minute you go for 9800th of that second and the last 200 seconds. That's how long man has been here. We may be speeding up a process. But in no way, are we the process and it's really out of proportion, it took a really good, healthy argument about how we as a population deal with what's about to happen. And it turned it into a political nightmare and a fight over whether it exists or not. And who created it? None of that's relevant to the issue of climate change, which is part of a living evolution of a planetary system.

Celena Muzic:

What would you say to those people who say they don't believe in climate change?

Andre Fladell:

I would say they need to look at North America and understand what the ice age was and ask what happened to the elephants in North America and ask what happened to saber tooth tigers and North America that were lions. They were giant Sloss. we have, our camels are indigenous to North America. I'd asked them what happened to these animals. I just, them how we went through four ice ages in the North America. And if there's no climate change, then how did that occur? But we'll get into that. If we talk about that.

Steve Wallace:

something near and dear to our heart and being in Florida and being in South Florida where we have a lot of, environmental benefits. One of the things that I like to know is

Andre Fladell:

how has Florida formed

Steve Wallace:

and what is Florida made out of?

Andre Fladell:

That's a good question. And that'll go to climate change because for those who don't believe in climate change, they're gonna have to pretend that Florida always existed in Florida. Didn't. It was created initially by coral reef system. It was a coral reef system that was growing under water. And Florida was submerged around the core reef system, which we know is 25% of the entire city population, particularly small fish and shellfish. We'll ask these shellfish died. And as the skeletons of these fish died, Nash, they gravel and sand started growing up. These reefs thousands and thousands of feet. Of the system of reefs covered with sand started developing in the Laurentide ice age, which is about 80,000. right? The Laurentide ice age, as the glaciers retracted the water, the fresh water that came out, like when you melt ice on a table, water pores carried sand and dirt. From the Appalachian Ridge, which is the East coast, mountain Ridge, and actually covered these reefs and the reefs kept growing and the dirt kept coming and Florida emerged as a platform. The platform that emerged originally was two or three times larger than the state is now. The first time Florida merged, it was about 340 million years ago. Florida has emerged in submerged four different times. So for people who think the environment doesn't change. Those are the same people who think thought has been there and hasn't been under the water and over the water for different. Alright. So we have a query of system put together with gravel and sand. We have an Appalachian mountain or Ridge system, which is washing South from ice age retractions, just like water flows in Northern Florida. You have red clay, which is part of what washed down from the middle of America. So that's how Florida comes to be. What's interesting. Also is North America. And what the Mark is, what I just want to go into for a second North America was a Lake and the East side of the Lake towards the Atlantic was original. West side was a reason. There was no Rocky mountains. What occurred was a plate called the Pacific plate, moved under the North American plate and lifted it and think about soup dish on a table. And you put your hands under the side of a soup that she lifted halfway on one side and all the water drops out. So the link dropped into the Atlantic ocean and the Rocky mountains was formed when the Rocky mountains was formed, all the soil or most of the dirt East was the bottom of this Lake. Which means it's sedimentary laid there. The rocks on the West side are igneous because they were all heat molten loft. So you have a Rocky mountain system, which was 20,000 feet high. It was, Igneous on the West and sedimentary on the right confirming, it was under an ocean or under a Lake on the East side. And that how this plate came about, the question is what's happening to the Rocky mountains. If you don't believe in climate change, the Rocky mountains is 14,000 to 13,000 feet high on average, not 20,000. That means the Rocky mountains, theoretically, isn't the collapse and mountains either collapse. When they grow the Rocky mountain system, isn't a collapsing state. How do we know it was 20,000 feet before? And how do we know how fast it's collapsing? If you look at the leaves in Florida, we'll note that the leaves in Florida have smooth ridges. If you look at leaves of you'll see, they have ridges all over them, like maple leaves. if you determine the relief. Structure and the Ridge system, you can project the height, the cold and the weather at which that leap was growing. So the evolution of leaves over time and how quick those fossil records show the reduction of ridges indicates the height that existed at that moment. So when we determine the height of a mountain range, or we determined where something was, we look at the vegetation fossils, and they give us all the information based on the adaption to photosynthesis. And that's pretty much what I can tell you about North America. when the ice age retracted, when this ice shelf retracted it films, all the river systems in the United States. So the Colorado river, the Ohio river, the Mississippi river are all formed by the fresh water drip of these glaciers. There's so much fresh water coming that the fresh water goes to the Atlantic ocean through what's called the st. Lawrence Seaway. So to do this again, you have the Laurentide ice shelf, retracting, you have freshwater form in all river systems in what was a Lake bed. You have what important to the Gulf of Mexico through the Mississippi, but you've got what, a point into the Atlantic through the st. Lawrence Seaway, and it triggers a nice age. Because the fresh water spill into the Atlantic changes the salt component, the currents, and the two new ice ages that come back to North America are the older and younger Dryas, which essentially ended 15,000 years ago. So the only thing I can tell you is Florida was much larger when the ocean was 100 feet lower and the ocean is a hundred feet lower during an ice age. And Florida has been submerged in four different times. And Florida currently is beginning to become submerged again.

Steve Wallace:

So you've told us

Andre Fladell:

how,

Steve Wallace:

Florida was formed and what it's made out of. Can you tell us who the original inhabitants of Florida

Andre Fladell:

are? Yeah. most people think that Indians and American Indians were the inhabitants of North America. The first people in North America. We're called the paleo Clovis people. the paleo Clovis, they occupied the continent, including the paleo Indians. If you want to refer to them as that Florida up until about 13,000 years ago. And that's not a lot of years ago, it's 13,000 and there was immediate strike over Lake. The great lakes Lake superior, the media strike. From what we have figured really caused tremendous disaster to vegetation. Tremendous. This are the population for practical purposes. It set North America on fire. At that time, the paleo Clovis people were essentially wiped out at that time. 13,000 years ago, we were in the retraction of the last ice age, the younger Dryas. The ocean was way lower than it is now. And there was a walking land bridge between Asia and North America. So people migrated into North America, from Asia over a walking land bridge. I met when the lotions ocean is a hundred feet lower. The, if there's a V system. So when you're up here, it's all the way across. But when the ocean is here, the distance of the oceans were half. So people are able to get over hopping islands that don't exist now going the idea that people couldn't cross the Pacific was one third. The size they'd land was half the size. So the migration came about 13,000 years ago. To what you think is the American Indian in Florida. The first Indians were not the Seminoles. They will call the Kaloosas. And the Calusa Indians lived here, and this is going back as far as 5,000 years ago. And then down the road, the Seminoles were the next people to occupy Florida.

Steve Wallace:

So what's, you're saying was, there was a lot of major changes in climates before humans.

Andre Fladell:

you have to realize, and the question I was asking before, Human beings may speed up a process, but if the process didn't exist throughout the history of the earth, then it doesn't exist. But if the process has always existed before humans were remotely involved and the arguments we're presenting, even in this podcast, About animal extinctions about people extinctions about the, the fact that North America, as a continent is rotating counterclockwise every year. there were just so many factors. The fact that North America moves away from Africa four inches a year, 65 million years ago, reptiles were on the planet. There was a media strike in the Yucatan peninsula that media strike annihilated the entire reptile population on the planet. If it wasn't for that strike, mammals would probably have not emerged to be the next, predator or the next major group Yellowstone, which is a super volcano blew off about 640,000 years ago. When North America changed the entire climate in North America, Yellowstone blue rocks, three and four States away from its explosion and Yellowstone will at some point blow again. The most interesting of all the climate change circumstances is a volcano called Toba coming from a place called Sumatra, the human population, which has only 200,000 years old was wiped out. But the 10,000 breeding pair they estimate, and there are different estimates. That's 70,000 years ago, and we're not talking a million. We're not talking 2 billion, 70,000 and years ago. That's half the time that. Humans have been populating the planet. The entire time regulation of the human race was wiped down to between two and 10,000 breeding pairs. So if you think that climate change doesn't occur, Vegetation changes. The central market didn't exist. Hawaii didn't exist. It's about chronic thing. The entire landscape and picture of the planet simply changes on a regular basis, but not in lifetimes that we measure, but in decades and centuries and larger periods that are really how planets should be measured.

Celena Muzic:

So since Florida is submerging,

Andre Fladell:

what

Celena Muzic:

do you predict for the future of Florida? I know we are seeing, and I don't know if this plays a role in it either, but we're seeing more shark attacks. We're seeing more floods, more hurricanes. should we all just sell our homes and move to. Somewhere else

Andre Fladell:

question. And, that's going to occur whether you like it or not. And I'm going to what we'll do in response about part two, about the affection, the future. yeah, there will be massive migrations in Florida and it's not because you should sell your home. You're not going to have a choice anyway, and there are things that are going to occur to the state by 2050 that are going to be, beyond understanding. And they're there to be seen. So the question occurs is not whether we debate whether this will happen or not. When we shouldn't be in the debate with who caused it, who didn't, who's responsible, those are silly debates. What we should put, what we should discuss is what's coming and what our alternatives are, whether we like it, or we don't, you can change all the things you want to change. But you're not going to stop the outcome. It's too late. The outcome has been written and it was written before men got here. It's just being sped up after the man got here. so I think we can handle all those other things in part two. And I'm open to any other questions or

Celena Muzic:

what about slowing it down? Maybe

Andre Fladell:

you can slow it down, but by 2050, what I will tell you is Galveston, Texas and the Jerry will be underwater. Norfolk Virginia. And the Chesapeake area will be underwater. Atlantic city and Hoboken will be underwater Miami and the Dade County area South of Miami will be underwater. Not they won't, maybe not. They could be not, they will be underwater by 2050 for a number of reasons. And you can't live in a place that's underwater. So you're gonna have massive migrations of people moving from Dade County, North New York. New York has issues. but it's not the five most sensitive areas that I've outlined. New York is sea level and it's going to have issues and it's going to have what issues long Island for example, was the end of a pile of dirt from a glacier or that's what it was. It was where the glacier line stopped. It's a little bit higher. Florida has some high points. It's not going to be completely submerged, but the coastal areas. Of Virginia, of Thora, of New Jersey, particularly bequest of land sinking and other issues. Like the Atlantic Ridge are very susceptible to being underwater. That will be massive migrations. There'll be no fresh water. And we'll get into that in part two. And let's just go to whatever other parts you have.

Steve Wallace:

Yeah. I'm excited. So we've talked a lot of serious scientific and environmental issues, but a lot of our listeners, while we enjoy all of the education provided to us, a lot of our listeners enjoy us asking our guests pop culture questions.

Andre Fladell:

And so

Steve Wallace:

Selena and I are going to indulge you with some pop culture questions, Prince. My first question is. What is your favorite song or songs of all time and why?

Andre Fladell:

Oh man. Blowing in the wind. Bob Dylan, life, by sliding the family stone. I don't know. I like rotary connection. Nobody even knows what they are Aladdin. I like things that have good messaging. I like things that make you think I like things that make you feel good. I like Bruno Mars. He always makes me feel good. I like rock and roll. I think, blowing in the wind is an interesting song. It's a old song. So I don't know. I just like songs that fit messaging and separate from dancing, there's dance music, and there's messaging music.

Celena Muzic:

Okay. Okay. speaking of dance music, what, when you were younger, what was your go to dance?

Andre Fladell:

Move?

Celena Muzic:

I know this one from my parents.

Andre Fladell:

Okay. I can do hustle. I can do Latin hustle. I can Lindy I can. The charring. I can remember. I can somber. I can do Chon shack and Mambo. I can do a single double and triple Lindy. I can also, I took dance in school.

Celena Muzic:

Okay. You should be on dancing with the stars.

Andre Fladell:

there wasn't nothing like that when we were there, but when we were younger, we would go to clubs. So New York city, there was on Ganos El MEO, the Ginza, the Rollingstone there was undines. There was Ramish. There was Steve Paulson that was hippopotamus, but just some of the clubs that I danced at. separate from the cheetah limelight. palladium, and of course, studio 54, all clubs. We danced that in those days, there were two ways you dance either alone or together and to get the mint, the hustle, or some version of Latin salsa. And, so that's what we did.

Celena Muzic:

Oh my, you are a party animal.

Andre Fladell:

when you live in Manhattan, it's just a question of what time you get up and what time you go to sleep. When you do that by the sun, when the sun's up, you sleep, when the sun is down, you get up and then you get burned out and then you move to Florida. Okay.

Steve Wallace:

here's my next pop culture question growing up. Who was your celebrity crush and the reason why? And then right now, who is your celebrity crush?

Andre Fladell:

Allie McGraw was pretty cool. there was. A girl in the mod squad with blonde hair. I don't remember her name, but she was, another one. I don't know those two.

Steve Wallace:

and how about now? Who's your celebrity crush?

Andre Fladell:

That's a good question. I wouldn't even, I wouldn't even really know. Sure. That would be a really good question. in terms of, I don't know, she cures interesting, but she's not a crier. I don't know that I have celebrity crushes anymore. I just, there are

Celena Muzic:

people,

Andre Fladell:

celebrity, she was pretty cool when she was on the super bowl. I dunno, I don't I'm I can't really think I have celebrity crushes. They're just people you find attractive for different reasons.

Celena Muzic:

we're going to keep secure. Okay.

Andre Fladell:

Yeah, she's cool.

Celena Muzic:

Okay. I have a question. and it's a pop

Andre Fladell:

slash

Celena Muzic:

political, if you could ask. Our current first lady, any question, what we'll do ask and our former first lady, any question? What would you ask

Andre Fladell:

the current first lady? I would ask her how she got to the point that you can put up with all this where she is, who she's with what's going on. She has to remain of iron. If anyone ever deserved the metal. This woman deserves a medal for what she's put up with whenever she signed up for. And I understand she knew what she was doing. I don't know. She signed up to put a life in a fishbowl to the extent that come there. I wonder how to be a mother in this situation and raise a child and expect the child not to be affected. Yeah, I would ask her higher. It must've been to just want to go from wherever she was in her life to some better place. And why ended up in the middle of a absolute crossfire nightmare that makes a battlefield look peaceful. And if this is really what she wanted in her life, not that she has a choice, I'd ask her how she got here. I asked her, I wouldn't expect an honest answer at the moment, but I asked her if she's had enough. So I think she's, I think she's done remarkable. I think you would think she thinks her job is to stay a bubble. This no matter what she thinks, she never, nobody seems to really know what she thinks. And I think that's remarkable that she's kept that under this kind of fire with Michelle Obama, she's a different kind of lady. She is, By being more American and being more street smart and understanding the population better, she's more interactive. So you get a chance to see all the things she does. I just asked her, what points you expected, what point she didn't expect as a first lady? What happened that she never thought? Or was it the Christmas tree decorations? how she felt that affected our children, where children. What was it? What was better for her children because of this. And what's worse for her children because of this. So I think there's a human component that we never get to find out. We know what they say, we know what they look like, but what they think in terms of their children and their family, it must have a extraordinary, large impact that we never know about.

Steve Wallace:

Okay, Selena and I are going to ask you one more pop culture question each, and then we're going to end part one. My last pop culture question for you is I know you're a renowned sneakerhead. So what is your favorite pair of sneakers of all time? Cause I know we, Darren and I have gift have given you some sneakers before for your great service. I'm just curious. What's your favorite pair

Andre Fladell:

of sneakers? He is a great pair of sneakers. Kenai. put out great sneakers on the ones I don't get are the standard brand stuff. the red bottoms, the Bhutanese have some really great kind of spikes sneakers, which I've got. travel Fox, there were different sneakers from times that really come up, the colonize or patent leathers with, just absolutely gorgeous stuff in its time. And then. Through evolution, like the cautious came out and they were the ones I have with sparkles and sequence and speckles. and to me, what joke to me is fun game. If it's played right, if it's not played to impress, but it's played to entertain and people understand the fun part of clothes is strictly entertainment. You can have so much expression and so much fun. And, growing up in New York, we were what's called metro-sexual, which means I don't care about color. I don't care about the fluff. I don't care about male and feminine. It metro-sexual wasn't what your preferences were. I was human being. It was what we preferences were an expression and we just did it to the end all the time. When I came to Florida, it was like, what's wrong with you? Why are you wearing these things? So I put them in the closet and got into shorts and the tee shirt.

Steve Wallace:

I've seen you at different events before and you dress to impress at some of the political events

Andre Fladell:

I trust to entertain. I try to every time find something new. I go out of my way to come and walk in and just. Knock it out. it's real in New York, we did that all the time in Florida. There is no sense of style as much in New York, every season, what the colors are that are in or out, how many buttons on a suit or in or out, the height of a dress him in New York. You know what last year is you know, that direction when coach had made, how many buttons, where they are, how white. In Florida, there was no such thing. And in New York there are like, it was at one time in Paris. Like it was one time in California. There's a sense of yearly style and we played it. We lived there, it was part of a norm in Florida. The norm is simply as relaxed as possible style and clothing is irrelevant. So I use dress up as a time to go to my roots. And just again, if I can hit it out of the park,

Celena Muzic:

yeah. Spoken like a definite true new Yorker and I. Definitely understand what you mean. I can spot a new Yorker in Florida, a mile away just by how they're

Andre Fladell:

dressed. I originally immigrated to this country from Brooklyn. I was born in Brooklyn, raised in Brooklyn. I immigrated to Florida and, English was supposed to be my first language, but when I didn't realize it, apparently it hadn't been so yeah, but New York is different. It's a different set of norms. People are quicker, a little more pushy. No in Florida. If you don't get line in 10 seconds, you miss a spot in New York, 10 seconds, you missed 10 spots. So people were more aggressive because of the nature of the living circumstance. It's a little quicker. It doesn't make us smarter from New York, but it doesn't sometimes make us react more quickly to things and living in Florida. You back off a drive and you start to be a little more relaxed and there's a little more community. And so there's a difference in the way we behave. When we see people in supermarkets or restaurants, the loudness of the voices, the quickness of the responses, and you can tell. Where people come sometimes from the way they're reacting to circumstances down here. I don't

Steve Wallace:

know, getting in line and poppies during season gets a little brutal though,

Andre Fladell:

and then will Debbie and already runs it and we try to avoid the lines when possible, but we don't want to go there.

Steve Wallace:

Okay. Selena, why don't you ask Prince one more question and we'll take this episode home.

Celena Muzic:

Okay, Prince. I have to ask you this. How do you feel about just because I constantly hear this and it's a social media dilemma, but how do you feel about all this inaccurate information being filtered through Facebook through all sorts of social media platforms? because it's being called the social dilemma where. It's a spew of misinformation and misinformation even about climate change.

Andre Fladell:

it's a great question. And it's probably a question you could talk for a half day on, but let's take it to where it is once upon a time to be involved in a situation you had a stand up show up and go somewhere. Once upon a time, if you want to be active in the community, you have to do things to get to that place you were seen as a player character, and you would show up at a meeting or an event and you would earn your place to speak. And you would gather information, the people who were. More successful and most accurate and most contributing we'd have a status and they develop, they would be heard socially immediate. Who's allowed a human being who is. Unqualified doesn't participate. Does next to nothing. Sit with a keyboard. And now suddenly they're the loud speaker in a room because they have more time on the keyboard or the more able to be more aggressive. So the people feeding information are not necessarily the contributors or the ones who've earned, or the ones who participate most often, people who don't earn and don't participate. So the weeding out and the filtering of idiots. It doesn't occur on social media like it did in the old world where you had, you looked into it, you act in it. And it was seen as an idiot. So the person in their bathroom with a person in their kitchen who is socially angry, who is in life, potentially a fit here and makes bad decisions who speaks with half information is suddenly the spokesperson for something, with the same equivalency or the equivalency. Of a person that really shouldn't has earned a place. So it's distorted who speaks it distorted is who we listened to. We don't know what's true. And not because the young children aren't fact checking, and then you can't really fact check every conversation. I think social media has destroyed the nature of government. I think social media is destroying the nature of intelligent conversation. I think social media. Because the people govern the country don't understand it. Can't govern it. We have no rules and regulations that are commensurate or that are equivalent to the problem. The people who could legislate this, run the companies that are the creators of the problem. They're not going to legislate. It's not their job. So we have a government that people who don't understand the social media or sophistication, they don't know tip talk, and they don't understand Instagram and they don't understand any of this. And so we have a runaway system putting out bad information, creating, an, not only an uneducated group, but actually giving bad education and people who are swearing to facts that aren't facts at all. They just someone's blog. today I gave information, lots of it in regard to climate. Maybe there's no Atlantic Ridge. Maybe there's no such thing as glacial rebound, and you can call it isotonic adjustment. If you want to look it up, maybe the North America isn't moving away and didn't start as Pangea. But the good part of social media, what internet not social media is you can fact check everything I said today. And then, and I can say that the. Creation of Florida could be 350 million years or 340 million years. But that's where it was. So the good use of the internet, it allows us to check facts, the bad news, anything next, it allows truths to become realities for kids, intuition who doesn't understand and can't discern the bad part of questions. The news media is as bad as the social media, because it's no longer Walter Cronkite and check. Huntley Brinkley and it's no longer people. This is the news that is now everybody has an opinion in between every news story. So I think the country is hurting dramatically for good information. Climate change is a victim of the exact situation where they make a movie based on political garbage, instead of incorporating the large picture and then saying, men can do something. They just blame the whole thing on one party or another. And there's nothing to a party. Man is a contributor. And we need to reduce our contribution, but the climate is changing. If a woman got wiped out, there's still going to be another ice age.

Steve Wallace:

thank you so much Prince for all your time. And everybody stay tuned for part two, which will be available shortly.

Andre Fladell:

Thank you.