Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast

Episode 25-Effects of Climate Change Featuring Dr. Andre Fladell

October 16, 2020 Dr. Andre Fladell Season 2 Episode 5
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 25-Effects of Climate Change Featuring Dr. Andre Fladell
Chapters
Attorneys are Human Too, a Podcast
Episode 25-Effects of Climate Change Featuring Dr. Andre Fladell
Oct 16, 2020 Season 2 Episode 5
Dr. Andre Fladell

We are once again joined by our political and environmental expert Dr. Andre Fladell in this episode.

Topics covered include:
Ocean Temperature
Flooding
Ocean Salinity and Acidity
Wildfires
Effect of Electronic Vehicles
Lightning Round

Show Notes Transcript

We are once again joined by our political and environmental expert Dr. Andre Fladell in this episode.

Topics covered include:
Ocean Temperature
Flooding
Ocean Salinity and Acidity
Wildfires
Effect of Electronic Vehicles
Lightning Round

Steve Wallace:

this is climate change.

Andre Fladell:

Part two.

Steve Wallace:

What are the effects on climate? And what's in the future. We are once again, joined by our esteemed political and environmental and climate change expert the Prince of Palm beach County, dr. Andre flood out. And we are again, joined by the rock. The reason why you tune into this show. Our cohosts and Lena music. And we are ready to jump into more climate change. So let me get

Andre Fladell:

started. What can you

Steve Wallace:

tell me about

Andre Fladell:

ocean temperature? Okay. In the first part, we talked about ocean rise and we spoke a little bit about how everything got here. We'll just talk about ocean temperature, the temperature of the Atlantic ocean. Over the last 40 to 50 years has only increased by about two degrees, which doesn't seem like a lot. The ocean temperature of the Gulf of Mexico over the last 40 or 50 years is probably up about 2.2 or 2.5 degrees. So you say how much could temperature? What could it really mean? What's to be the big thing of a couple of degrees here or there. And again, we're not talking about who caused it. We're not talking about how it occurred. We're not talking about whether it happened this week or last year. and in context, before I answer that the earth is on an axis, the axis actually changes every 26,000 years through a process called precession. When the axis of the earth changes over this 26,000 years. The heat from the sun and where it affects the ocean and which gets more direct lighting it's affected. There's also something called eccentricity eccentricities, where the earth changes its orbit. So it gets closer to the sun for longer periods of time. This happens every a hundred thousand years. So it's to be remembered that the change in the orbit of the planet over a hundred thousand years and the change in the access, both the curb. And before we start putting blame on what happened last week and who poured what into the ocean, which we will just remember. There are a lot of other factors in North America in the summer. The earth is 2 million miles further away from the sun than the winter. Let me do it again in the winter. The earth is 95 million miles from the sun. It's 2 million miles more further away in the summer. So if it's 93 95 and 95, 97, depending on the orbit, why is it warmer when the earth is 2 million further from the sun? And that's because of the angle, which is that he is hitting and that's going to ocean temperature. Marine life moves and lives in different temperatures, different types of aquatic life like different temperatures. When the temperatures change, those lives migrate their food sources live in temperatures. That's how they got there to begin with. So what's not being noticed is the breeding habits of. Marine life, where they feed, who they feed off of. And then when they move following currents, which are also changing, they come in contact with other Marine life through time that they've never been in contact with. And you're having major battles and Wars between elements of sea life that never existed before because of food supply changes or because of current. And he, and some other factors which we'll get into. Things like the krill, which are small little animals, which are feeding for Wells and feeding for penguins. And these are being affected by temperature changes dramatically. as far as you brought up in the earliest tornadoes and you brought up hurricanes tornado season in the Midwest is essentially March, April may watch in April. It's when the warm air from the Gulf meets the cold air from the North. if the Gulf is two and a half degrees warmer than it was, then the difference between the energy meeting, the cold and the hot increases. So that in 2017, when the Gulf never went below 73 degrees for the first time ever in a year, the frequency of tornadoes in the Midwest set a record. And in 2017, we had the strongest and most frequent tornadoes. Coincidentally, it was tied to that heat of the Gulf. Last year in April, the Gulf went three degrees above normal for a period of time. Almost two months during that time was the largest. Hurricanes, I'm sorry, tornadoes in the Midwest on record again. And the strongest. So the temperature of the Gulf being two and a half degrees is affecting the frequency of tornadoes and the amount of tornadoes. But let me tell you about hurricanes, which has been more interesting. Hurricanes deriving strength from the heat of the top of a body of water for every one degree, the speed of a hurricane increases 12 to 15 miles an hour. If the Gulf is two and a half degrees warmer than it was 40 or 50 years ago, then with the same amount of hurricanes and the same conditions, the speed difference is 40 miles an hour on two and a half degrees, whether it's a 12 to 1538, 40, 45 miles an hour different. Let me tell you what that's doing. You've been watching for the last two years. Storms in the Gulf, which they predict may be a category one which hit category three, you STEM is being predicted by media and news reporters as, Oh, it's going to be maybe a category one and it's not 90 miles an hour winds. It's 140. And you, how did that? And it's happening, not over weeks, it's happening over one night or two days. Because the weather people are not accounting, but the difference in the change in the temperature of the water at this time and the reporting on the old standards five years ago. And that's why the under-reporting the dangerous hurricanes coming out of the Gulf war practical 10, 20 years ago, because there wasn't enough heat. To create the speed at the rate, the speed being created the same circumstance 40 years ago, it would have been storms hitting the golf stones, hitting Louisiana storms, hitting Texas. Now we're having 130 mile an hour winds under the identical situation in the Atlantic ocean, in the Caribbean basin, as it gets towards Hispaniola, or it gets to its Haiti and it gets towards Dominican Republic. Those waters are warmer. So the hurricanes again of building quicker. Within not building quicker is coming off of the African coast, where they begin what's happening there. And we spoke about Sahara and sand is as the Sahara desert converting into a Lake system. Once again, like it was mega Chad, 15,000 years ago, the Sahara sand is stopping the creation of hurricanes. So we have had other than last year for a period of six years before that. Massive sand over the ocean of which we said the bottom two or three inches of the Atlantic, or now to Heron sand contribute the ocean rise. We've now realized that the whole, the hurricanes coming off of Africa are not likely to be our problem. And don't really form with the place and finally gets stronger. Yeah. They get to the American coast and the most dangerous hurricanes fresh right now are probably coming out of the Gulf. And this is all based on ocean temperature,

Steve Wallace:

my next question is, can you tell us a little bit about ocean rising?

Andre Fladell:

people think that coastal flooding is, the biggest problem and that people think that the barrier islands will be flooded and, coast areas around Dade County to be flooded. And I'm going to tell you that's the least of all the problems of ocean rise. The real problem of ocean rise is salt water intrusion into the fresh water system. And let me give you an idea. imagine if by 2050 that's 30 years, that's in a lot of people's lifetime and certainly in everyone's children's healthy lifetime by 2050, there will be no fresh water left in either the Glades or Dade County. And I will predict here today, they will be not. Not only will the cities be on the water that we spoke about around the East coast, but Miami essentially, and the Everglades will be intruded by the ocean. Our aquifers go up and down. When there are massive droughts in our water or rain or vouch in our state in which happened, the ocean has always come higher as the aquifer goes lower. Or the last time we had this type of job was probably 30 years ago. The ocean is about eight to 10 inches higher now, and will be another four inches higher in 10 years when there will be a major drought and the aquifer ever goes below the level of the ocean itself, which will occur in the next major drought and will occur even more so in 20 years. The oceans coming straight up the aquifer, straight into the Everglades of salt water, just as any other water will completely overtake that system. When that happens, everything that's alive in the Everglades will die. The plants are freshwater plants. They will die. The wildlife was freshwater lion wildlife. They will die. They don't evolve. They die. The drinking water will be completely intruded so that you're going to look at a place like they County will there be no jobs? There'd be no more building. There'll be no insurance available for homes even have no economy. And the people that simply by the millions are going to migrate from Dade County to probably the I four corridor.

Steve Wallace:

What about ocean salinity and ocean X

Andre Fladell:

acidity. That's more technical, but really important stuff. As the water gets more salty because when the air is hotter, there's more evaporation, that's pulling more out. And so what's left is the sole component as the one that gets more salute salinity, it gets thicker and denser as compared to fresh water. So it gets heavier. So it moves to the bottom. It doesn't stay on top, which stays on the top right now. Is that kind

Steve Wallace:

of like the dead sea in Israel? Like when I went to Israel, I was in the dead sea and I thought

Andre Fladell:

that was well buoyant because the water is more dense. So it pushes you up because when you push against it, it's resisting like the mattress. The problem with the denser water is number one, the fresh water stays on the top. It starts to divide out and by the way, the fresh water evaporates quicker. And in more merits, even more quicker because warm air contains more humidity. It can hold more water, but the salt goes down in the salt water. The dental water is thicker and goes down. It affects current. It resists current. So the normal currents and currents are important. Cause currents again, move fish, move sea life, but also control the winds over the ocean. And if you change the wind patterns of the ocean, where. The evaporation occurs and where the, what a drops changes. Cause the winds over the ocean, the currents determine what areas of land get more water. What areas of land get less water. So you see major changes in where the rain goes. You're also seeing major changes in how much water is dropped, how quickly the course of the amount of water the air will hold. And this all is related to ocean salinity. Although people don't think so. There's a lot of evidence that the Gulf stream is slowing down. Goshen is slowing down because of the solidity resistance of the dense of water. who cares if the Gulf stream slows now? the Marine life that all derives or the krill and delightful, these small algae, they care, you've got. A planet that is a living planet. That's changing continually ocean salinity is a component of the change. So this is not something we can control necessarily. I ages come from freshwater in the North Atlantic ocean, the way an ice age comes out on number of so what it doesn't freeze at 32 degrees. It takes a lot lower temperature. When the water becomes clear fresh water, then that starts freezing up quickly. When the I spoke of in part one, when the water came in from the ice shelves and it from the st. Lawrence Seaway, it made the North Atlantic so fresh, watered, it froze and create another ice age. So if man's going to have any impact on solidity and water, we're probably going to slow down the next ice age as opposed to overheat the planet. So I don't know if that takes care of salinity. I guess the

Steve Wallace:

followup question that is, and I mentioned the first question is what about ocean acidity?

Andre Fladell:

Should the city is a separate problem. This is where men is involved. To some extent carbon dioxide CO2 is absorbed by the ocean visits, just lays on the water. And it's combined with something called calcium carbonate, which forms carbonic acid. It makes the ocean a little more acidic. Also has it. The oceans are able to absorb more soul. This causes something called coral reef bleaching. Now Cory bleaching remember is core reefs, how flawed it was formed. Core reef is where 25% of the Marine life lives as 4,000 plus species just within core reefs in this area. So when you have query bleaching and what is query bleaching basically means that the algae died because of the acid. It means that the curves turn white, it means that the coral reefs die. And that creates a whole bunch of separate problems in and of itself. More than that shellfish can't form shelves in ocean acidity because the mineral and nutrient absorption won't occur. And because the calcium is tied up. With the co two in chemical bonds. So shellfish will stop forming shells and stock forming mutated shells and stop forming altogether vicious skeletons, which require the same minerals will not form properly. So you have weakened species of fish, which will die. You have coral reefs, which will die. And when you say shell fish are going to die, let me make English for that. No more shrimp, no more lobster. No more crabs, no more muscles, no more oysters. No more clams. Just to name a few. The problem with the acidity change and the ability to form shelves, which is not make-believe it's real happening currently is that the speed of change is happening quicker than the species can adapt to it. So if one wants to say that the man contribution has spent the process. The damage of that is the speed in which things are changing or affecting the species of ability to mutate or evolve to offset the change. And that's an interesting dynamic that no one discusses, but it's a dynamic. also remember that we have a planet, which I think shouldn't hold more than two and a half billion people. There's 7 billion people on the planet. There will be 9 billion people on this planet within a short period of time projected. We are carbon dioxide breathing machines. You have 7 billion people consuming the natural resources of a planet and breathing carbon dioxide. So if you want to get rid of 7 billion, Carbon dioxide produces. Let the population die when it's supposed to. Instead of artificially keeping it alive and exploding, we've created a society where we transplant the organs. We have medications, we have all kinds of different things we do, and we won't let anybody die, which is a horrible thing in doing so we've exploded the population of a planet, which is now sucking up its resources and producing carbon dioxide. So we are a contributing mechanism to climate change if we want to be. But let me talk about the last thing, which is most important and maybe more important than all of this. The plaintiff requires a shell, the plankton, which is a food source for everything now, more than that, but those of you who watch SpongeBob Squarepants, you'll all know that the Chung bucket restaurant has crabby patties. And for those of you watch it with some degree of consistency, the secret ingredient and query plat is as it was plankton. So can you imagine that we'd have down and sponge Bob square pants, no crabby patties, which would make Patrick and mr. Squidward fairly unhappy. So what my fear is not so much the krill starting out the Wells and the CS, the shellfish, because I don't really eat shellfish, but imagine having no crabby patties and. SpongeBob. I just can't imagine the damage and devastation.

Celena Muzic:

can I ask, would that contribute into some sort of evolution? Where were these sea animals would maybe evolve into. Needing something else.

Andre Fladell:

That's exactly. What's going to happen. Exactly. What's going to happen is evolution maybe on a quicker level, but there'll be, there's always winners and losers example in a high carbon dioxide ocean with high acidity. So the sea grass starts to flourish and the plant life flourishes, while the animal life dies, the animal life then goes to an evolutionary process. It gets minimized, the jellyfish are the winners, by the way, the jellyfish will just. they'll suck everything up. They've been there before there'll be thereafter. But what happens is that the plant like thrives in the carbon dioxide and they start absorbing it, creating an oxygen based lotion instead of a CO2 ocean. The ocean will retract again through an ice age that the plants come back on the shores and the planet goes through its restoration again. but let me talk about aquifers, which, Stephen had mentioned earlier, there were five major aquifers in Florida. The aquifers in Florida are the Florida and aquifer, which is one of the big ones, the superficial aquifer, the Biscayne aquifer, the intermediate aquifer and the sand and gravel aquifer. These are the five backward for in Florida. the ones in the panhandle are surrounded and red clay. And, that would be probably the sand and gravel aquifer. The ones that we're concerned about are the Florida and the Florida then is on the central West coast like Tampa and st. Pete. That's all fed by the Florida and aquifer. The superficial aquifer feeds Orlando, the East coast from, Space Cape Kennedy down South thought is fed by the Biscayne aquifer the issue with the Biscayne aquifer, in my opinion, because of its low level and its low lying area is the greatest danger of salt water intrusion. When the water comes up from Dade County, it's going to run straight up or attempt to come straight up to Palm beach County where we live. So that the salt water intrusion is going to not only annihilate most of the Bay County, which it will, but we'll start effecting Broward to give you an example of that in Hallandale, there were eight fresh water Wells, which that city catch it's waterfront for them to completely unusable, salt and treated. So if you speak to someone and how they'll knows about what assistance, if there was supplies min had sold water intrusion already. South thought of what a management used to have a system where they used to do gravity flows of drainage. They would just simply open it and gravity would take it into the ocean. The gravity flow of drainage doesn't work anymore. They have to pump it because the ocean is now higher. So what we've been talking about in part two are the strengthening of hurricanes because of the heat. Of water. We've been talking about the changing in fish, Marine life, what will live in what will die and will migrate because of the nature of acidity in water. We've been talking about the change of current changing currents because of salinity and water. We've been talking about really man's input and what men can do versus what the plan is going to do with the men as input or not. And it's a very interesting education on climate change, which is why the movie didn't help this. What the movie did was politicize an event that should have been a scientific discussion with no blame. You can't blame the planet having 7 billion people. You can't blame the planet for having cars that use fossil fuel when Henry Ford had no idea when he invented the industry, that was some going to be what it is. You have to look at where you are, and don't worry about how we got here, which you want to worry about. It is where we're going and what we're going to do. There should be no more building on barrier islands at all. Nothing should be allowed to be constructed. Anything which comes down should not be allowed to be put up the barrier islands, present, prevent storm surge. Take away those barrier islands and the water's going to come in seven miles, eight miles every time there's a storm water in day County in 1970 was flooding five times, five times a year. It's now up to 30 times a year, major flooding, whether there's rain or not, the King tide, the flooding by the intercoastal that people are trying to fix. It reminds me of a little boy with his finger in the dike. They don't, they can't fix it. That it's just a question of what you're there on the water. You can throw all the money, you can throw all the activity you want. You're not going to stop what's occurring happening to this planet. So the idea of putting millions and millions of dollars into correcting the moments. So someone's backyard, won't be under water. Their whole house is going to be under water that the flood area is going to be under the water. So we have to make decisions as a population. What are we going to do next? And we may have to, re-examine where our population is. Projected to where we should be building homes where we should, we allow population to exist. The state is doing nothing constructive to that.

Celena Muzic:

Andrea, I wanted to know a little bit more on how you feel about electric vehicles being a big, because we drive so much, I feel like that's a huge part of our carbon footprint. but there's also the concern that these electric vehicles, they run on lithium batteries, and the earth only produces so much. And should we convert to hydrogen fuel or hydrogen cars? To make this change and better, slow down the situation.

Andre Fladell:

to talk about electric cars at first, I thought Elon Musk was some such sort of fragrance. I didn't realize he was a CEO of a company. but then when I realized there was an electric car being made. At some point regularly, fossil fuel to go to something else. And whether it's going to be electric question version, we're in the process of having a, discovery of new vehicles of new machines of new equipment. And we're just continually developing technology. And electric cars are primitive. they're like a pager versus a cell phone versus a smartphone. You're looking at the page, a version of a telephone. You're looking at an electric car. Electric car batteries will change. The length of life of the batteries will change. It's the steam engine versus the nuclear engine. You project this electric car, not for two years, but for 20. And it will be efficient and it will not. They'll come off a lithium, they'll come to other materials. So what you're looking at and you're talking about is the primitive creation of an alternative source of moving around. It's the future. Now Uber made taxis primitive, Amazon made store shopping primitive, and the new vehicles will make the gasoline engine like the steam engine permanent. So if you're in a rush, be careful way to charge your car. If your patient four or five years, you're going to look at the scar and go, I can't believe my cell phone. They used to carry like a walkie talkie. And now my cell phone is this big, the electric cars in the future will take care of itself and it'll adapt to what's available in which economical also

Celena Muzic:

Andre, how come other countries like Iceland. and I watched this whole documentary, but they already found different ways to create electricity and fuel. and like I said, using hydrogen, how come that's not something that we're picking up on in the United States,

Andre Fladell:

it's supply demand and market. If they, at some point. One F P and L, and the type of, around the country, the electric companies decide that this is feasible, economic and shape right now they're making money right now. They're making sure the wires don't fall down during hurricanes. Right now there, they believe evolve. And if at some point the arguments made that this is a cheaper price. It's all based on economics. And what's affordable. If you said to every person in the country, we can change this, but your electric bill is going to go from a hundred dollars a month to 300 a month. I wouldn't want to have the vote because you'll lose that vote on. if it goes from a hundred, $210, we'll have it. If it goes from a hundred to 200, we won't have it. It's just development. Again, technology versus cost. it's we live in a free society and we live in a capitalistic nature society. So supply demand and cost is a component in outcome.

Celena Muzic:

Very true. Very true. I just, I figured we cared enough about the planet to maybe bite the bullet

Andre Fladell:

here enough about things besides the planet, for example, 26 trillion in debt, isn't important, but your electric bill. Going up 20 bucks is important. What's happening in Africa in terms of what a system is. Nothing we think about, but the coast of Florida is important. We talk about the planet, but we don't really. Think about the planet as much as you think we do. We think about our children. And if they're going to have a swimming pool with water, that's not going to make them sick. We think about that. We can turn on a sink, water and not get poisoned. Unlike Del Ray, where you never know what's going to happen, you, we think about what's important and germane to us, our children, people we deal with day to day, we talk about the planet, but now after the conversation's over, we go to lunch in the nearest restaurant.

Celena Muzic:

Very true. Very true. and private, just to add, to Steven's comment of the fires. and I mentioned this to you earlier, during the debate, president Trump said, Hey, why don't we just replant in all replant trees and all these places like California that have been burning or have burned down, Can you explain a little bit to us on what that, if it would help essentially, or what changes would that bring or is it even preventable? All these fires because they're getting worse and worse. And I feel like California may become

Andre Fladell:

uninhabitable. So we spoke about ocean currents and ocean wins. And how the winds turn, where the water gets dropped because it's evaporating over the freshwater on top of the ocean, the winds carry the rain and drop it. If the wind patterns change, then the weather would a drops change. And wouldn't, hadn't have been changing example. When the wind comes from Norway, Greenland ice shelf melt slower. When the winds come from the South West, which is where they're coming from now, Greenland melts faster. So let's make fires out of this. Australia had a fire Australia's fires were the largest in the history of probably known currently in the planet. The Australian buyers will lodge in California. The estimates are that 400 million tons of carbon dioxide were created. In Australia. Let me just look, talk about Australia. 400 million tons of carbon dioxide of that 400 million tons guess were went over the ocean and guess what happened? It dropped and got absorbed, creating acidity. So the first thing to know is the more fires you have, the less oxygen absorbed, more carbon dioxides created more city. He goes into the ocean. So remember fire's notion of the city are related one, two. The dry season in California or the season where this isn't, the fire season is now a month earlier and a month later, it's that way because the climate has changed slightly. The snow covered mountains, don't have quite as much drip and they're not quite as wet. They're not quite the wet component isn't as long. So instead of having fires over a period of two months, the fire period becomes four months because it's warmer. So now me having more fires, but just the nature of twice as much time to have dry ground to have fires, the California fires are occurring because the ground is dryer because the air is warmer because even though the pers the rain hasn't changed dramatically, the ground is drying more quicker. So you have less vegetation because of previous firing burn, you have longer and more. Winds because the wind patterns would change. So now you have a fire problem in California, which isn't getting better, planting a tree or planting trees, nothing wrong with Pantene vegetation. It's vegetation will hold the soil and vegetation will remember the vegetation also soaks up. Water quicker. if Trump said you should plant trees, I think there's nothing wrong with it. The solution is much greater. You need to clear the area you need to. There's an area that's prone to burns. We shouldn't be putting houses by these trees. We're creating disasters by not again, we're away from the flood. Move away from where the dryness is, change the terrain. And I agree I would move population away. I wouldn't allow more building those general areas. I would replant receipt and retry to regrow. The green component. So I think Trump, somebody told him to go plant trees. She said, plant trees, there's nothing wrong with that. There's a larger problem. The logic problem is the heating of the planet, how it's affecting the dryness of soil in the length of time, Florida, for example, has warmer summers and shorter windows. If you look at the list three years or so. I went, does that seem to be, they used to come at the end of September. Now they come in the middle of the end of October. It's only three weeks. They used to start right after Memorial day. Now they stopped three weeks, a little bit. So your heat and cold, the changing just two degrees. Now what could do two degrees be the ice age difference in temperature on the planet was 11 degrees and 11 degree difference in the planet. Created an ice age. Two degrees is one fifth of that thought.

Steve Wallace:

Excellent. Selena. You want to ask Andre one more question before you take us home with the lightning round?

Celena Muzic:

Yeah. Yeah. So aside from the typical recycle, what do you think we should be thinking about as a younger generation to slow down this process? Or even a. make some changes in our daily lives, because this is really gonna affect from what I'm understanding. Mainly the younger generation who's going to have to live through this. Should they have, should they even consider, having less children, having smaller families,

Andre Fladell:

the things we should do, we're not going to Corona virus. Affects this proportionally people with secondary underlying issues and elderly. And I don't mean elderly 60. at least 75 and up those people didn't exist. 50 years ago, the population had a life expectancy under 70, not under 80, the secondary conditions that we're keeping people alive with our medication. Most people weren't living. So we created a population that was susceptible to a virus on a greater level. So then statistics make the virus to appear even worse than they are. If you back out that population, then the statistics are not as dramatically. Scary, not good. Similarly, you've got to look at the same thing with the planet. If I were running the planet where I were running the state, first thing in the state, no one builds another stick on a barrier Island, Mary Rollins from Broward County Dade County, right up the other side, you would not be late to the stick. we put up on those things would be public recreation, no hospitals, no schools, no people, no kids, no buildings. Secondly, I would put a freeze on almost everything. So that in the areas that are likely to be flooded third, I'd feel more what a retention system? I, 95 and the Florida turnpike. If you drive to any intersection on nine 85, you have these four huge holes all the time. Those shouldn't be Walmart or donation or Costco, where they should be a retention ponds. And the retention ponds from date straight up to Orlando should be connected by canals. We should be retaining water. The reason you retain water at that level, I'm talking massive retention from. Remember, we own the land on nine 95. We own the land by the turnpike. So it's not a cost issue in terms of acquiring property. We have the ability to do this. Then when the drought comes, which is going to happen. We then allow the retention ponds to back off, down the drought aquifer, which would hold the ocean from polluting the Everglades. If you want to stop this from happening, you have potential water, reservoir tension. We live in a tropical climate with there's more than enough water. Our problem is we have no idea. We have our heads backwards and I'm keeping this clean. So you don't have to believe it. We keep things backwards. So we flush water out when we have abundance. And then we get into droughts. When we should have retention systems, the simple easiest retention system would be the 85 and the Florida turnpike Carters. They should be massive reservoir canal systems, and that would build up over time, continually everything should, we shouldn't have flooding over the water should just go drain right into it. And then when we hold the water, use the water against the droughts. As far as the building construction. Where you can build them where you can, should be changed based on the likelihood of it's existing. No more hospitals, no more airports, no more schools, anything built in front areas. We need to realize in a battle when the Hill is overrun you back your position, illusion, troops in a battle, you either withdraw and get another strong hold and you hold the Fort. you just get run over the climate's about to run over South Florida. We either withdraw and set up a new perimeter, which is what we have to do, make new rules. So we can go on for another a hundred and something years when we'll have new technology, we're going to get overrun by the climate, which is exactly by 2050, what's going to happen. Thought it will be in a disastrous migration with no fresh water. It will have a County of people that are going to be upside down economically. We're watching something happen. And what were watching it, denying it.

Celena Muzic:

Very true. Steven I'm in shock. I'm like, I don't know. I need to go find a cave.

Steve Wallace:

I think we need to pick it up by you closing us out with the lightening round. Selena.

Celena Muzic:

I'm in so much shock Andre. I'm thinking Steven, I'm moving to Ohio.

Andre Fladell:

there's still Palm beach County. It's a large state. But if in fact thought has been submerged before, and they've been flat, we know the oceans rising argue. How cool, why? If what's about to happen, you read the duct, the punch, I get hit in the face. I'm suggesting deduct the punch and I'm suggesting the technology will come. We can lower the speed of a hurricane. you have to do is make the water colder. You can take the water on the Gulf, where the hurricanes are hitting the coastline and bring water from the bottom up by pumping it. If you change the water just before the hurricane two degrees, you lower the force of the hurricane 30 miles. We can change a lot of the occurrences. We're so busy ignoring it and not preparing to make the changes or protection. So I say the state of Florida as a government needs to make a decision. A 2050 decision that we either withdraw and set up a new perimeter or people are going to wind up dead. And the reason for the death will become an inability to look forward. Oh,

Celena Muzic:

fantastic. Andre, thank you for that information. I'm going to take you to the lightning round.

Andre Fladell:

Are you ready?

Celena Muzic:

Okay. So it's just a series of questions, this or that, and it just helps us get to know you a little bit better. Okay. So first question Nike's or Adidas,

Andre Fladell:

neither. I don't think we're general brands of anything except Walmart. my bucket hat or my

Celena Muzic:

okay. Hot dogs. Are pizza shorts or pants,

Andre Fladell:

shorts all day

Celena Muzic:

beach or

Andre Fladell:

mountains all the time. Okay.

Celena Muzic:

Pizza or tacos

Andre Fladell:

piece of all the time. I can put anything I want on a picture. At least I know what I'm eating.

Celena Muzic:

Okay. This go or Chacha.

Andre Fladell:

Disco, Chacha. I was a little too restrained and constricted. This goal was, it was more fun. Okay.

Celena Muzic:

Manhattan party scene or Miami party scene,

Andre Fladell:

the same person twice. And it's dramatically different from group to group. Miami has a similarity that gets redundant.

Celena Muzic:

that is fantastic. And I'm going to ask you a bonus. Random pop culture question. That's right. Surprise. Surprise. What do you think is at the bottom of the ocean since no one knows. I know what I think. I think that there's dinosaurs

Andre Fladell:

down there.

Celena Muzic:

Dinosaurs. Yeah.

Andre Fladell:

Dinosaurs are reptile, which means it would need heat in order to and sunlight in order to digest food. In course, it's cold blooded. It's a good thought, but you mean some version of it jellyfish at dinosaur and you might call some of the life, but what you have at the bottom of the ocean, a lifeforms that live without light lifeforms that live in what we think are toxic environments, lifeforms that live, that are subject to all the things coming from the center of the earth in terms of chemicals and nutrients. And so from this. From these fishers from the openings at the bottom of the ocean is where probably the primordial soup probably where life comes from initially. It's probably where the proteins developed, which were single several animals at the bottom of the ocean is the history of who we are at the bottom. The ocean is the history of art, our existence, as a people in the planet as a living species, I think the bottom of the ocean is a history book and it also predicts where the future is going to be. I think when all is said and was above the ocean from the ocean will rise and other breed, as I'd always thought, whether it was amphibian, I think the ocean will be the saving grace of the new version of the earth. And when I say the new version of the earth, 300 million years, 200 million years, you would think, we think in terms of, it's 2020. We think in terms of, after the industrial revolution, I think in terms of there was a North America, there wasn't a North America, the planet doesn't see us by our conversation. It sees us by eons the universe and the solar system sees us by the planet itself as an unnoticeable split second in the universe. I think the ocean in our history is our future. And our past is where we come from originally. It's where will our next, our replacements going to come

Celena Muzic:

from? Wow. said, Andre. Thank you.

Steve Wallace:

thank you so much, Prince. this will conclude, the part two of climate change.

Andre Fladell:

And

Steve Wallace:

again, we love to have you back. We're gonna, we're probably, we'd love to have you back on, social media slash news media analysis. And certainly after the election, we want to hear your analysis of what happened

Andre Fladell:

yes. In a shout out to Del Ray beach volleyball.

Steve Wallace:

Absolutely. Okay. Thank you so much, Prince. Thank

Andre Fladell:

you.